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New born babies learn even in their sleep

New born babies are such fast developers because they keep learning even in their sleep, researchers have found.

Even though infants may stay awake for just a few hours a day, their brains keep working around the clock, scientists said.

They believe that the brain is constantly adjusting and adapting to the physical world despite appearances that they are dozing.

The discovery was made by experts at the University of Florida after simple experiments with 26 sleeping newborns.

Researchers played a tune to them, and then followed it with a gentle puff of air to the babies’ eyelids. After about 20 minutes, 24 of them had learned to anticipate the puff by squeezing their eyes shut.

The babies’ brain waves also changed.

Dana Byrd, a psychologist, said, “We found a basic form of learning in sleeping newborns, a type of learning that may not be seen in sleeping adults.

“They are better learners, better ‘data sponges’ than we knew. While past studies find this type of learning can occur in infants who are awake, this is the first study to document it in their most frequent state, while they are asleep.

“Newborn infants’ sleep patterns are quite different to those of older children or adults in that they show more active sleep where heart and breathing rates are very changeable.

“It may be this sleep state is more amenable to experiencing the world in a way that facilitates learning.”

The results, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could be used to identify babies that are not developing properly such as those at risk of dyslexia or autism, she added.

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Read and repeat, over and over again

Does your child have a favorite book they want to read over and over again? Or worse, wants you to read over and over again?

Despite its annoyances, repetitive reading — whether you’re reading to your child or they’re reading to you — offers a surprising number of benefits for new readers.

Vocabulary and Word Recognition
The more a child reads, the larger their vocabulary becomes. When a child reads or hears the same book multiple times, they become familiar and comfortable with a greater number of words.

Pattern and Rhythm
Hearing favorite stories read aloud helps children become aware of the pattern and rhythm of text. Language is more than just words — it’s how words sound and connect to each other.

Fluency

Repetitive reading allows a child to read without stumbling or stopping, and reading time becomes more pleasant for everyone. Once a child masters one book, it makes moving on to another more appealing.

Confidence
With fluency and comprehension comes greater reading confidence. Children who can follow a story and don’t stumble over words are more self-assured about their abilities and more likely to enjoy reading.

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Teaching Phonics to Children?

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Phonics is a necessary part of any good method of teaching children to read. Teaching Children phonics and helping them develop phonemic awareness is the key to mastering words, which is the first key step toward successful reading. Children need to develop a knowledge of the letters, the sounds represented by the letters, and the connection between sounds created by combining the letters where words are formed. This is an essential part of mastering reading, and enabling children to become independent readers. By learning phonics and phonemic awareness, children gain the ability to pronounce new words, develop clear articulation, improve spelling, and develop self confidence.

When it comes to teaching your children to read, it must include three basic principles:

1) Reading for the child, whether it’s a word, sentence, or story, must appeal to your child’s interests.

2) Never pressure or force your child into reading, turning it into a negative “event” in their life. It should be a fun, enjoyable, and rewarding experience. This will take ample amounts of patience on the part of the parents, and some creativity.

3) Teaching your child to read must begin with the mastery of the phonemes – the individual sounds which makeup the words.

The basic process of teaching phonics and phonemic awareness to children includes teaching them the letters and letter sounds; then you teach the child to combine (or blend) various letter sounds together to form words; which is then followed by reading sentences and simple stories. This is a logical progression for children to learn reading, where they develop accuracy in decoding words and pronouncing words. This method of teaching also helps the child to spell correctly. Gradually, the different elements of phonics are combined to produce new words, and leads to the discovery of new words by the child using this process which becomes an “automatic reflex”.

Teaching phonics to children should take 10 to 15 minutes each day, and these “lessons” should take place in several small sessions each day – such as 4 or 5 session lasting 3 to 5 minutes each. For older pre-school children, lessons can be slightly longer; however, several minutes each session is all that’s needed.

One way to start teaching phonics to children with with ear training – by helping them develop the understanding that words are made up of smaller units of sounds, or known as phonemes, and when you combine these sounds, a word is formed. You can start this with very short sessions, as already mentioned. A few minutes a day is all that you need. The key, however, is consistency and patience.

During these short sessions, sound out words slowly and distinctly. You can do this without even making the child aware that you are trying to teach them. Simply take words from your everyday speaking to your child and include oral blending sounds into your sentences. For example, if you wanted to ask your child to drink his milk, you could say: “Joe, d-r-i-n-k your m-ilk.” The words drink and milk are sounded out slowly and distinctly. The level of sound separation can be set by you to increase or lower the difficulty. Thus, if Joe has a tough time figuring out that d-r-i-n-k means drink, you can lower the difficulty by blending the word as dr-ink instead.

Alternatively, you could simply pick different words and play blending sounds games with your child. You simply say the sounds of the word slowly, and ask the child try to guess what you are saying.

This concept of individual sounds forming words may take some time for your child to grasp. Some children will pick it up quickly, while other children may take longer, but one thing that’s certain is that if you keep it up, your child will catch on. Below are some sample words which you can use to play blending sounds activities with your child.

J-u-m-p   J-ump
R-u-n   R-un
S-i-t   S-it
S-t-a-n-d   St-and
M-i-l-k   M-ilk
S-t-o-p   St-op

The first word is more segmented than the second word, and will be more difficult to sound out. Please note that hyphens are used to indicate the letter sounds instead of slashes.

ie: J-u-m-p  /J/ /u/ /m/ /p/

This is done to make things easier to read; however, when you read it, you should not read the names of the letters, but instead say the sounds of the letters. This type of ear training for phonics and phonemic awareness should continue throughout the teaching process, even well after your child have grasped this concept. It can be applied to words with increasing difficulty. Again, please always keep in mind that not all children can readily blend the sounds to hear the word, so you must be patient, and drill this for days, weeks, or even months if needed. Consistency and frequency is the key to success here, and not sporadic binge sessions.

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What is Early literacy

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Early literacy is what children know about reading and writing before they can read or write.

So, we know that early childhood is a critical stage in a child’s learning life, so how do teach them what they need to know?  Well, what they need are Early Literacy Skills.

We are not trying to teach children to read, but we’re giving them the tools they will need to be ready to learn when they go to school.

Teaching these skills begins at birth.  And as we saw earlier, it is important for kids to start Kindergarten already having these skills.

One of the way is to use —Print Awareness.This is noticing print everywhere, knowing how to handle a book, and knowing how we follow the words on a page.

—Some ways to teach print awareness:

◦Let children turn the pages in a book.

◦Occasionally, follow the words you are reading on a page with your finger.

◦Point out “environmental print” which are words on signs, cereal boxes, etc.

—It is more important for the reading experience to be positive than it is to read for a specific amount of time each day.

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Teaching Moral Values

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If there is one desire that virtually all mothers and fathers share, it is the wish to raise a good child. But ask any dozen parents to define “good” and you are bound to get a dozen different answers. One parent cares strongly about manners and politeness. Another will cite responsibility and obedience to family rules as the essence of virtue. A third parent upholds self-control and cooperativeness as the most admirable of character traits, and fourth emphasizes such qualities as honesty, kindness and trustworthiness. But in truth, good behavior is all these things and more, and given the proper opportunity, your youngster will be able to make all of them a part of his own character.

As a loving parent, what strategies can you use to encourage character building? For one thing, you can give your child plenty of reasons to trust you and to feel secure in your care. For another, you can be a good role model, demonstrating the values and types of behavior you want him to adopt. You can also set reasonable limits and positive expectations, appropriate to his age and temperament. You can be firm, fair, consistent and loving disciplinarian without resorting to harsh punishment. And you can help him find his way within the larger community of friends, school and strangers – explaining, interpreting, guiding and lending a sympathetic ear as he meets each new social challenge. But you cannot make your child be good – that in end, is up to him.

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Tips to improve your child vocabulary

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  • Read out aloud to your toddler

Sit your child down and read him a story out loud. Involve your child in the reading process by letting them turn the pages. Show them pictures in the book. Keep on asking questions on what they think might happen next. This practice will help them to connect specific words with what they see in the picture book as well as improve your toddler’s vocabulary.

  • Have conversation with them

Ask your child questions, if you leave her at the daycare then you might be able to ask her what she did at the daycare that day. If grandma takes care of her while you’re off to work, then ask what she and grandma did all day long. Allow her time to think about her answer and do not correct her even if she says something that is not quite correct. You do not want to lower her self-esteem when it comes to speaking. Low self-esteem is a big setback when it comes to trying to improve your toddler’s vocabulary.

  • Get them to ‘show and tell’( Story telling)

Take your toddler to a park, a beach or downstairs play area. Have her collect some items wherever you go. Let her bring them to you and then ask her to name them for you. You can say the word out loud and ask her to repeat it after you. Make it fun, by adding in descriptions and incorporating the show and tell items into imaginative tales.

  • No baby talk to your child

Children will often revert back to ‘baby talk’ because it’s comfortable and familiar. It takes too long to learn the proper words. Don’t let this happen. There is only so long that they should be speaking in baby talk. Just remember that you are on a mission to improve your toddler’s vocabulary!

  • Use Picture reading technique from a book

Use a book with pictures of common objects such as toys, food, clothing and furniture; arrange them all by category. Show the picture of the object and point to the actual item for your child. Then ask her to name the object and describe it.

  • Learn a new Word each day for your child

Pick a vocabulary word and explain what it means to your toddler. Encourage your child to use that word as many times as possible. Make a game out of it or reward them every time they use it appropriately. These are the building blocks that enable your toddler to speak properly and help you to improve your toddler’s vocabulary.

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Ways to enjoy reading at home

There are many ways to enjoy reading with your child. Here are a few ways to make reading a fun part of your everyday life.

Family Reading

1 .Develop family reading routines and rituals

Find a regular time of day when you can dedicate story time into your day. You can read in the morning, after school, or before bedtime! Making story time a cozy routine makes reading an essential and pleasant activity.

2. Read what interests your child

The nutrition facts on the milk box, newspapers, recipes, maps, and game instructions all make great reading material if your child is interested.

3. Try books that reflect your daily experiences

Making connections to topics you read about is a fun way to keep children engaged.  Open up opportunities for conversations like discussing similarities and differences between the book and the museum visit.

4. Let your child select books

When you visit the library, let your child select books. Try both fiction and informational books, and ask the librarian for recommendations based on your child’s interests.

5. Reread your child’s favorites

It’s common for young children to request the same book again and again. Re-reading familiar stories offers children a chance to absorb information over time and lets them master the whole story.

6. Encourage storytelling

Encourage your child to tell you a story from time to time or to retell a story after you’ve read it several times. Don’t feel the need to correct how she’s telling the story. Let her enjoy the experience of storytelling.

7. Have fun while reading

Try whatever style feels comfortable for you and your child. Some ways families have fun with stories include:

  • Acting out the story while reading by using facial expressions, gestures, body movements, and voices to make the story come to life.
  • Making the story relevant to your child’s life by adapting the story to include her name, a friend’s name, or your pet’s name.
  • Finding props to go along with favorite stories and offering them to your child to use in her play.

8. Change your setting!

It can be fun to read books in different places in and around your home.  You can even ask your child where she wants to read a particular story.

9. Get to know your child and your own reading style

  • Knowing your child and your own reading style is important for three main reasons:
  • It offers you an opportunity to observe what interests your child. Be it science, art, interactive books or wordless books, you will figure out her current interest and support her in appropriate ways.
  • You won’t impose your preferences on your child; instead, you will share what you like with each other and get a chance to explore those beyond your favorites.
  • It allows your child to understand and respect that every individual reads differently and it is okay.

There are lots of ways to encourage and enjoy reading. Try these ideas and do more of what your child enjoys.

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Ask your child question

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Asking questions while reading to your child is not only great for encouraging your child to interact with the book, but it is also extremely effective in developing his ability to comprehend what he is reading. You see, if our main objective in “reading” is getting our child to “sound out” words, we have missed the boat entirely. Even children who can decode words and “read” with great fluency still might not be able to comprehend what they are reading. If a child can’t comprehend what he is reading, there really is no point to reading at all!

While your child is a baby, ask him questions such as, “Do you see the cat?” while pointing at the picture of the cat. This will not only develop his vocabulary, it will also encourage him to interact with the book that he is reading. As he gets older, ask him to point to things in the book himself and make the noises of the animals he sees.

Once your child is about 2 or 3-years of age, begin asking questions before, during, and after reading the book. Show your child the cover of the book and ask him what he thinks it is going to be about (predicting). While reading, ask him what he thinks is going to happen or why he thinks a character made a particular choice (inferring). If a character is depicting a strong emotion, identify that emotion and ask your child if he has ever felt that way (connecting). At the end of the book, ask if his prediction(s) came true. Afterwards, ask him to tell you what he remembered happening in the book (summarizing).

Modifying each of these techniques during read-alouds to meet the developmental stage of your child is a great way to promote and increase reading comprehension!

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Things Your Child Needs to Know Before Kindergarten

Have you ever wondered what exactly your child needs to know before kindergarten?

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Please keep in mind as you look over this list that  kids learn best with hands-on experiences, not memorization or drill practice! These early years with our children should be about fostering a love to play, explore, and learn!  Also, it is important to note that our children are all different and gifted in unique ways.  Obviously, if your child has special needs, exceptionalities, or is delayed in a particular area, this won’t necessarily be relevant to your child.  This is simply a guide…not something to stress about!

Personal and Social Development

Approach to learning

-Shows eagerness and curiosity as a learner

-Persists in task and seeks help when encountering a problem

-Is generally pleasant and cooperative

Self-Control

-Follows rules and routines

-Manages transitions (going from one activity to the next)

-Demonstrates normal activity level

Interactions with Others

-Interacts easily with one or more children

-Interacts easily with familiar adults

-Participates in group activities

-Plays well with others

-Takes turns and shares

-Cleans up after play

Conflict Resolution

-Seeks adult help when needed to resolve conflicts

-Uses words to resolve conflicts

Language and Literacy

Listening

-Listens with understanding to directions and conversations

-Follows one-step directions

-Follows two-step directions

Speaking

-Speaks clearly enough to be understood without contextual clues

-Relates experiences with some understanding of sequences of events

Literature and Reading

-Listens with interest to stories read aloud

-Shows interest in reading-related activities

-Retells information from a story

-Sequences three pictures to tell a logical story

Writing

-Uses pictures to communicate ideas

-Uses scribbles, shapes, and letter-like symbols to write words or ideas

Alphabet Knowledge

-Recites/sings alphabet

-Matches upper-case letters

-Matches lower-case letters

-Identifies upper-case letters

-Identifies lower-case letters

Mathematical Thinking

Patterns and Relationships

-Sorts by color, shape, and size

-Orders or seriates several objects on the basis of one attribute

-Recognizes simple patterns and duplicates them

Number concept and operations

-Rote counts to 20

-Counts objects with meaning to 10

-Matches numerals

-Identifies by naming, numerals 0-10

Geometry and spatial relations

-Identifies 4 shapes- circle, square, rectangle, triangle

-Demonstrates concepts of positional/directional concepts (up/down, over/under, in/out, behind/in front of, beside/between, top/bottom, inside/outside, above/below, high/low, right/left, off/on, first/last, far/near, go/stop).

Measurement

-Shows understanding of and uses comparative words (big/little, large/small, short/long, tall/short, slow/fast, few/many, empty/full, less/more.

Physical Development

Gross-Motor Skills

-Pedals and steers a tricycle

-Jumps in place, landing on two feet

-Jumps consecutively- 7 jumps

-Balances on one foot for 5 seconds

-Hops on one foot 2-3 hops

-Hops on one foot- 6 ft.

-Throws a ball with direction- 5 ft.

-Catches a thrown ball with arms and body

Climbs a playground ladder

-Skips smoothly for 20 feet

Fine-Motor Skills

-Stacks 10, one-inch blocks

-Strings 4 1/2″ beads in two minutes

-Completes a seven piece interlocking puzzle

-Makes a pancake, snake, and ball from playdough

-Grasps pencil correctly

-Copies:  vertical line, horizontal line, circle, cross, square, V, triangle

-Copies first name

-Prints first name without a model

-Grasps scissors correctly

-Cuts within 1/4″ of a 6″ straight line on construction paper

-Cuts out a 3″ square on construction paper

-Cuts out a 3″ triangle on construction paper

-Cuts out a 3″ circle on construction paper

-Uses a glue stick appropriately

-Uses appropriate amount of glue for tasks

The Arts

Creative Arts

-Identifies 10 colors:  red, yellow, blue, green, orange, purple, black, white, brown, pink

-Uses a variety of art materials for tactile experience and exploration

Music/Movement

-Participates in group music experiences

-Participates in creative movement/dance

Creative Dramatics

-Makes believe with objects

-Takes on pretend roles and situations

Do you agree with this list?  Is there anything that needs to be added (or taken away) based on your experience???

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How to Improve Thinking Skills in Children?

Thinking Skills Chart.

Enhancing thinking skills in your kid can be real fun and thrilling. Nothing can be more effective than asking the right type of questions in an easy going manner. Questions that you ask should have simple and proper wordings. When you ask questions that lead to a mental stimulation of your kid’s thought process, it can be really good for you as well as your kid. One of the most important things to remember while asking probing questions to your kid is to creating questions by using different types or levels or platforms of thinking.

Enhancing thinking skills is best performed in a systematic and well calibrated manner. Your kid will not be ready to think on many aspects of life. Your main goal should focus at motivating his or her inner level of consciousness. Experts in human psychology grade thinking skills in humans into six categories. These thinking skills are common to all individuals and you will need to modify or restructure the questions in such a way that your kid will understand and comprehend the meaning very easily.

Developing Knowledge Skills

Knowledge skills include remembering, recalling or retrieving correct, right and appropriate and previously learned information or details to bring or draw out factual and data based answers which may either right or wrong.

Developing Comprehension Skills

In reality, comprehension means grasping, comprehending or understanding the real meaning of materials that signify materials and things.

Developing Application Skills

This skill involves applying and adapting previously learned and comprehended information or details to new, strange and unfamiliar scenarios.

Developing Synthesis Skills

This thinking skill is a bit difficult to learn and understand. It involves applying the previously acquired information, knowledge or skills to gel them together into a clear pattern which was not there before asking

Developing Evaluation Skills

This skill involves judging, inferring, deciding and concluding based on a set of conditions or criteria, without real or wrong answers.

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How to teach Phonics?

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Teaching children to read by teaching phonics activities is a lot like doing math, where you have to know what the numbers are, how to count, and you need to learn to add and subtract before learning to multiply and divide. Teaching phonics to children is no different where you follow a step by step approach by first teaching the child the alphabet letters and phonics sounds, and then teaching them the combination of different letters to create different words, and using words to form sentences. It is a very logical and sequential buildup of phonics knowledge and reading ability.

Before a child can learn to read, he or she must first learn the alphabet letters, and know the sounds represented by the letters. It’s usually easier to teach some consonants and short vowels first before moving on to more complicated things such as consonant digraphs (2 consonants formed to produce one sound, such as “ch” or “ph”) and long vowels. As you can see, teaching children to read by the phonics method helps them develop phonemic awareness, and it is also a very logical and straight forward approach.

Start off by teaching your child the phonics sounds. You can choose to teach your child in alphabetic order going from A to Z, or you can teach several commonly used consonant sounds and vowels, and go from there. For example, you may start teaching your child /a/, /c/, and /t/ (slashes denote sound of the letters). Once your child has learn to quickly recognize these letters and properly sound out their sounds, you can then teach them to blend /c/, /a/, /t/ to make the words “cat”, or “tac”, or “at”.

As you introduce more letters and phonics sounds in your lesson plans, you can generate more words, and slowly introduce short, simple sentences to your reading lessons. Depending on the age of your child, I would suggest keeping the phonics lessons relatively short – around 5 to 10 minutes. Sometimes, just 3 to 5 minutes for a short lesson is plenty, and you can easily teach these short phonics lessons 2 or 3 times each day for a total of 10 to 15 minutes. Young children tend to be forgetful, so repetition is very important.

You don’t want to make the lessons too long and boring, that the child begins to feel like doing a “chore” when learning to read. So keep it short, fun, and interesting. By keeping the phonics lessons short, you also avoid overwhelming the child with too much information, and always remember to make sure your child has mastered one lesson before moving on to new material. Confusion and uncertainty will only make their learning effort difficult and frustrating – so review often, move on to new material only after they’ve mastered the current lessons.

So when can you start teaching phonics sounds and lessons to children? Not everyone will agree with me on this, but I believe that if your child can speak, then your child can learn to read. Of course, every child is different and unique, and some children will be more receptive to learning reading than others. One thing for certain, is that the earlier a child learns to read, the better.

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Steps To Raising Kids Who Like Books

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Do As Kindergarten Teachers Suggest Long Before You Meet Their kindergarten School Teacher
It’s never too soon to start reading to your kid. Apply these reading tips you’ll someday hear in parent/teacher conferences, and you’ll not only do wonders for your kid’s educational development, you’ll know what to mumble off whenever you get accused of not paying attention at a parent/teacher conference:

-Ritualize a reading time 5-7 days per week

-Alternate reading nights with your spouse to offer a new perspective and voice

-Get weird with the voices when you read

-Read when your kid’s around. Your example is  major factor

-Visit the library regularly and let your kid select whatever they want

 

Don’t Complain About Reading The Same Books Over And Over
My 3 kids could each read before kindergarten, and I attributes it to putting “miles on the page” with them on their favorite books: “They just need to hear it over and over again, point to the word, and have that access. It’s OK to read the same book 5,000 times.” Mind numbing and torturous for you, but OK.

Occasionally Read Them Something You Want To Read
Reserve a couple nights every week to put down the picture book you’ve read 5,000 times in favor of a classic you love. “They were far above what my little 6- or 5-year-old brain could handle, but I loved listening to him read it and that shared experience.” Bonus points for letting them hear their first swear words in the name of literacy.

Create Activities Around Elements In The Book
Make a book exciting and not just a bedtime precursor by using its thematic elements to inspire fun stuff in the real world.

But, mostly, you just need to make sure you kid sees a page at least as often as they see a screen. And talk funny when you read to them. Do that enough, and it should be smooth sailing.

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How to teach your baby to speak?

Baby speak

 

 

Babies absorb so much in the first few years of life. It is amazing what an impact everything you do has on an infant. With infants, it can sometimes be hard to tell what they are taking in because they cannot yet communicate with words. Teaching a baby to speak is fundamentally important for their development.

Talk to them all the time. As you change them, tell them what you are doing, and always speak in a soft, calming voice. Go through each step of everything you do with them. It may seem strange to say, “Now, I am taking off your diaper. I see you’re wet.” or, “Look at this nice big bowl of applesauce! Doesn’t it look yummy?” But babies respond to it, even if it may be hard to see it.

Watch your baby’s responses. When you talk to them, pause, as you would in a normal conversation, and give them time to respond. Sometimes they may smile, babble, or giggle, or sometimes they may just make a face or sit there and watch you. Either way, you are showing them the pattern of communication that they will use later on in life.

Read to them at least once a day. Show them the pictures and point out things in the pictures that go along with the story. Even if you are just reading a baby book of words, point out the picture of the ball, or the cat. They identify with things they can see. They make the connection between the words spoken and the pictures they see. Even taking objects that they are familiar with and speaking the name of the object will enhance their vocabulary, and make important connections between words and the world around them.

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How You should Read to your Child?

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This simple, yet powerful, interaction can be enhanced with a few simple techniques that you can add in to your daily read-aloud sessions.

*Don’t feel that you have to read every word. It’s okay to shorten the reading to better suit your child’s attention span and interest level, and your own reading style. Sometimes you can simply have a conversation about the pictures and then read the story at another time.

*Change your tone of voice and your expression for different characters or to emphasize words. These voice changes will make the story come alive for your child.

*Ask your child questions that require more than a one-word answer. ‘Why’ and ‘How’ questions work well: “Why do you think the little boy acted that way?” “How did you feel the last time you visited the doctor?”

*Provide your child with explanations and actions that build vocabulary for unfamiliar words. “The book says that black bears ‘lunge’ forward and ‘swat’ their huge paws. The word ‘lunge’ means to move forward quickly and suddenly. Can you show me how you would ‘lunge’?” “Do you know how to ‘swat’ at something? Will you show me?

*Before you open the book, discuss the author and illustrator, look at the illustrations on the front and back cover, and make predictions about what might happen. Once the story is over, discuss if your early prediction was right, and make connections to the book with real-life experiences or other books.

*Direct your child’s attention to the words and letters in the book, saying such things as, ”Here are the words I am reading. This word starts with a B, just like your name!”

*Point to the words as you read them, or move your finger along under the words to show that we read from left to right and help your child start to connect each spoken word with its written form.

All of this may seem like a lot to try at once viagra pharmacie sans ordonnance. Don’t worry: you can start adding in one thing at a time. As you become more comfortable with a new technique, you can add another. Often, parents think their child should be quiet and listen to the story, but you will notice that these techniques involve your child’s interactions throughout the story. It is the active participation, such as pointing to or talking about the pictures, making predictions or observations, and answering questions, that allows your child to build vocabulary and comprehension skills. It will also increase the confidence and enjoyment your child has with books and propel his or her love of reading into the future.

A Book a Day keep your child Reading away.

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Milestone on your child reading – Infographic

If you are a parent of a 6-month-old infant or a 5-year-old preschooler, you’ll find here useful tips on how to make books a part of the child’s playtime and bedtime routines.

Reading together with young kids helps them:

–learn to recognize letters,

–understand that print represents the spoken word,

–become aware of how to hold a book, turn the page and start at the beginning,

–realize the relationship between letters and sounds,

–expand their vocabulary,

–begin to develop oral language skills.

How-to-cultivate-smart-readers-infographic

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Ask the right question to your child

Ask for the right question

Your child probably fires dozens of questions at you every day. But turning things around and posing some to him can fuel his excitement for learning. For instance, asking, “Why do you think the birds always come back to that same spot in the backyard?” can spark a conversation that introduces a variety of interesting concepts.

But beware of turning your child’s life into a pop quiz. “Some parents make the mistake of asking kids to display their knowledge. “They’ll ask, ‘What color is this?’ even though it’s obvious that their child knows it’s green. If you want your child to stay excited about learning, it’s much better to engage him in an active inquiry than to ask him to spit out routine knowledge.”

And when you ask about his day, be specific (“Did the guinea pig in your classroom have babies yet?”) rather than too general (“How was school?”). “Everyday talking is essential to learning,”. “Kids need to be able to take the hubbub of their lives and spin it into narratives if they’re going to become capable readers and writers.”

If you don’t know the answer, look it up. If your child is curious about something, take the time to explain it to her. But if you don’t have a clue either, it’s perfectly all right to say, “I don’t know. Let’s find out.” Turn to a dictionary, an encyclopedia, or the Internet, and do some detective work together. “You’re showing her not only how to find more information but also how thrilling it can be to learn new things,”

Our Time to Learn books may have the answer your child questions.

Time to learn

 

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Your Child’s Curiosity

Child’s Curiosity

Curiosity is something all babies are born with.  They come into the world with a drive to understand how the world works:A newborn follows sounds, faces and interesting objects with her eyes.

-A newborn follows sounds, faces and interesting objects with her eyes.

-An 8-month-old shakes a rattle and then puts it into his mouth to see what this object can do.

-A toddler takes a stool to reach the counter top where the phone is—a “toy” she loves to play with.

 

-A 2-year-old pretends she is the garbage collector and puts all her stuffed animals into the laundry basket “garbage truck” to figure out what it feels like to be in the other person’s shoes.

 

Babies are born learners, with a natural curiosity to figure out how the world works.  Curiosity is the desire to learn.  It is an eagerness to explore, discover and figure things out.  The more curious a child is, the more he learns. Nurturing your child’s curiosity is one of the most important ways you can help her become a lifelong learner.

Parents don’t have to “make” their children curious or “push” their children to learn.  In fact, research shows that it is a child’s internal desire to learn (their curiosity), not external pressure, that motivates him to seek out new experiences and leads to greater success in school over the long term.

Find out your child curious question and answers through our Time to Learn program.

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Why Science is important to kids?

why do stars twinkle

Science helps answer all those tough questions kids ask, like ‘Why is the sky blue?’ and ‘Why do stars twinkle?

-Science involves a lot of communication with other people.

-Science develops patience and perseverance in kids.

-It can help kids form a healthy dose of scepticism.

-Science teaches kids about the world around them.

-Science can spark in kids’ minds that they, too, can help solve the world’s big problems.

Science teaches kids about life

Science involves a lot of talking and listening to others; it develops patience, too – a lot of the time in science things don’t happen overnight.

Add to the mix are skills for life such as perseverance, problem-solving and researching.

It helps kids to think about what could happen before they do it, to create a hypothesis in their mind. Then kids learn that not everything works the first time. Some experiments fall in a heap and you have to find out what went wrong, and try again.

Science in school also teaches kids about the way the world works eg, how clothes are made or why volcanoes erupt?

It can spark ideas in kids’ minds that they, too, may one day be capable of creating solutions to big problems.It can teach kids to form their own opinions rather than take those of others for granted. In science you’re taught to go about getting a whole lot of information from different people and sources – experts, teachers – it’s not just Googling for the answer online.

Have you started using science to teach to your child?

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How to encourage a reluctant reader?

Encouraging a Reluctant Reader

  • Work out why they are reluctant

The most likely reason your child is reluctant to read is because they find it an effort. Talk to their teacher if you have any specific concerns, but a child can find reading hard work even if they have no learning difficulty. Just make sure there are no other obvious reasons why they might not enjoy it: negative responses from others, feeling pressured, eyesight problems, over-tiredness, or being given books that are either too challenging or too easy. Also, think about what times of day they are reading – are they well-fed, well-rested, and have had a chance to play? For some children it’s just that reading is not high on their list of priorities when there are far more fun activities they can imagine doing instead!

  • Be enthusiastic

The most important role you can have in this is to encourage and praise your child when they read, especially if it is a big effort for them. Try to remain enthusiastic even when progress seems slow.

  • Have someone else listen to your child read

Anyone who will be non-judgemental and encouraging. Get them to say something like, “Mum tells me what an amazing reader you are. Can you read me a story?” Small children can also be a good choice, as your child might enjoy the role reversal, but be aware that little ones have a limited tolerance for slow readers and so this can backfire.

  • Use soft toys as listening companions

Get them to be interactive, and every so often have them respond to the story – jump with excitement, hide behind a cushion in fear, look closely at a picture… Illiterate furry animals who fall down in amazement when your child reads a particularly challenging word also go down a treat.

  • Don’t feel limited to books

Any reading is good reading. It could be that your child might prefer to read something other than stories – this is often particularly true for boys. Try comics, junior magazines, toy catalogues, reading apps, kids’ websites – my son loves the Lego site. Even if they only manage to read a few words, and the a lot of the time is spent looking at pictures or playing a game, the important thing is that they are associating good feelings with having to read words.

  • Be patient

Reading involves a lot of different skills that need to come together in order to make sense out of the written word. Some children pick this up quickly, while others need more time. With good teaching and encouragement they all get there. I didn’t enjoy learning to read as a child but when I grew up I loved studying literature, worked in publishing for a while, and now writing is my hobby! A slow start doesn’t have any bearing on what kind of reader your child will be as they grow up.

<a href="http://www viagra pour jeune homme.learningtech.com.sg/free-presentation/”>Request for a Free Presentation on our program here

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Testimonial from Holistic Bilingual Program

Reading habit start from young. With research showing that the best ways to develop bilingualism being through early exposure, many parents are starting to realize that such learning should not be simply confined to a pre-school setting.

With children spending most of their pre-school time at home, engaging learning aids are essential in supporting your child’s holistic language development needs. Designed to be concise, attention-grabbing and interactive, children are expected to not only develop language competency in both English and Chinese after going through our Holistic Bilingual Program, but also a strong desire for learning.

Request for a Free Presentation on our Bilingual Program here

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