Posts found under: Complete Educational (A+) Program

Teaching Moral Values

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If there is one desire that virtually all mothers and fathers share, it is the wish to raise a good child. But ask any dozen parents to define “good” and you are bound to get a dozen different answers. One parent cares strongly about manners and politeness. Another will cite responsibility and obedience to family rules as the essence of virtue. A third parent upholds self-control and cooperativeness as the most admirable of character traits, and fourth emphasizes such qualities as honesty, kindness and trustworthiness. But in truth, good behavior is all these things and more, and given the proper opportunity, your youngster will be able to make all of them a part of his own character.

As a loving parent, what strategies can you use to encourage character building? For one thing, you can give your child plenty of reasons to trust you and to feel secure in your care. For another, you can be a good role model, demonstrating the values and types of behavior you want him to adopt. You can also set reasonable limits and positive expectations, appropriate to his age and temperament. You can be firm, fair, consistent and loving disciplinarian without resorting to harsh punishment. And you can help him find his way within the larger community of friends, school and strangers – explaining, interpreting, guiding and lending a sympathetic ear as he meets each new social challenge. But you cannot make your child be good – that in end, is up to him.

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Ask the right question to your child

Ask for the right question

Your child probably fires dozens of questions at you every day. But turning things around and posing some to him can fuel his excitement for learning. For instance, asking, “Why do you think the birds always come back to that same spot in the backyard?” can spark a conversation that introduces a variety of interesting concepts.

But beware of turning your child’s life into a pop quiz. “Some parents make the mistake of asking kids to display their knowledge. “They’ll ask, ‘What color is this?’ even though it’s obvious that their child knows it’s green. If you want your child to stay excited about learning, it’s much better to engage him in an active inquiry than to ask him to spit out routine knowledge.”

And when you ask about his day, be specific (“Did the guinea pig in your classroom have babies yet?”) rather than too general (“How was school?”). “Everyday talking is essential to learning,”. “Kids need to be able to take the hubbub of their lives and spin it into narratives if they’re going to become capable readers and writers.”

If you don’t know the answer, look it up. If your child is curious about something, take the time to explain it to her. But if you don’t have a clue either, it’s perfectly all right to say, “I don’t know. Let’s find out.” Turn to a dictionary, an encyclopedia, or the Internet, and do some detective work together. “You’re showing her not only how to find more information but also how thrilling it can be to learn new things,”

Our Time to Learn books may have the answer your child questions.

Time to learn

 

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Your Child’s Curiosity

Child’s Curiosity

Curiosity is something all babies are born with.  They come into the world with a drive to understand how the world works:A newborn follows sounds, faces and interesting objects with her eyes.

-A newborn follows sounds, faces and interesting objects with her eyes.

-An 8-month-old shakes a rattle and then puts it into his mouth to see what this object can do.

-A toddler takes a stool to reach the counter top where the phone is—a “toy” she loves to play with.

 

-A 2-year-old pretends she is the garbage collector and puts all her stuffed animals into the laundry basket “garbage truck” to figure out what it feels like to be in the other person’s shoes.

 

Babies are born learners, with a natural curiosity to figure out how the world works.  Curiosity is the desire to learn.  It is an eagerness to explore, discover and figure things out.  The more curious a child is, the more he learns. Nurturing your child’s curiosity is one of the most important ways you can help her become a lifelong learner.

Parents don’t have to “make” their children curious or “push” their children to learn.  In fact, research shows that it is a child’s internal desire to learn (their curiosity), not external pressure, that motivates him to seek out new experiences and leads to greater success in school over the long term.

Find out your child curious question and answers through our Time to Learn program.

Request for a Free Presentation on our Education Program here. 

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Why Science is important to kids?

why do stars twinkle

Science helps answer all those tough questions kids ask, like ‘Why is the sky blue?’ and ‘Why do stars twinkle?

-Science involves a lot of communication with other people.

-Science develops patience and perseverance in kids.

-It can help kids form a healthy dose of scepticism.

-Science teaches kids about the world around them.

-Science can spark in kids’ minds that they, too, can help solve the world’s big problems.

Science teaches kids about life

Science involves a lot of talking and listening to others; it develops patience, too – a lot of the time in science things don’t happen overnight.

Add to the mix are skills for life such as perseverance, problem-solving and researching.

It helps kids to think about what could happen before they do it, to create a hypothesis in their mind. Then kids learn that not everything works the first time. Some experiments fall in a heap and you have to find out what went wrong, and try again.

Science in school also teaches kids about the way the world works eg, how clothes are made or why volcanoes erupt?

It can spark ideas in kids’ minds that they, too, may one day be capable of creating solutions to big problems.It can teach kids to form their own opinions rather than take those of others for granted. In science you’re taught to go about getting a whole lot of information from different people and sources – experts, teachers – it’s not just Googling for the answer online.

Have you started using science to teach to your child?

Request for a Free Presentation on our Time to Learn for you child.

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Make Learning Math Fun

Helping your child learn Math

How to make learning Math fun?What can you do as a parent if your child develops math phobia? Every day after coming from school your child rants over doing his math homework or complains to you “What good is Math?” Or is it worse than this? He is never able to crack the Math test or thinks “Only nerds are good at sums”. It is undeniably a worrisome situation as numeral literacy is every bit as important as any other skill and you can’t let your kid remain a math phobic for the rest of his life. The more you dilly-dally the problem the worse it will be so you have to tackle the situation head-on. We’ve come up with 5 tips to make Math fun for your kid-

Tip 1: Your first step is to assess your math skills: Does calculating percentage still sends you in frenzy? Chances are likely that you are unintentionally passing your math fear to your child. Do you quite often say “I was always bad at Math” and did your kid pick up on that uses it to his advantage? Your negative attitude toward numeric literacy can hamper your child’s progress towards learning math. When you start hearing your own negative words coming out of your kid’s mouth then start exploring alternative ways to make math fun for your kid.

Tip 2: Storytelling in Math: Kids love stories. Tell fairy tales and ask your child to count the characters or you act out the story and count the characters together. Sounds fun, isn’t it? There are many interesting math story books for children that make different math skills enjoyable and easy to learn.

Tip 3: Play Math:Temporarily shift from the text books and math worksheets. Take out some dominoes, blocks, a deck of cards or a pair of dice to practice math skills. Remember that children have to be willing to develop their numeric skills so make the lessons more interactive, interesting and fun. You can also try playing board games that require logical thinking, adding, subtraction and more.

Tip 4: Help your kid notice Math in everyday life: Tell your kid that Math is a part of our daily lives. As you plan meals, clean your house, order food from the local restaurant or keep score during games, emphasize the necessity of math skills to your kid. Make your child understand that Math classes are not intended to make his life boring but they enable him to learn a skill that is a practical necessity.

Tip 5: Study together system: Arrange a weekly study together. Kids can explain things to each other in a way that makes them comprehend the math facts better. It will be learning cum fun activity that kids will definitely look forward to every week.

Preview A Time for Math to help your child to start off with Math.

Request for a Free Presentation here.

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Complete Educational Program (A+) review from PeiPei.HaoHao

For busy parents, sometimes it can be quite challenging to source for suitable learning resources for their children. Recently, I was introduced to the Complete Educational Program from LearningTech, which is a holistic program for children from preschool to primary school.

One interesting feature of the program is Eltee Pen, which is an audio learning device. By tapping the icons, it would “speak” or “sing”! The children were amazed by it!

There are 3 components: Awareness – Time to Learn, Ability – A Time for Math, Attitude – Lifetime Values.

Awareness – Time to Learn

This is a set of encyclopedia with 3 sections, Living World, Explore, as well as Science & Technology. A question is used as a stimulus to trigger the curiosity in the children. In addition to the text, Eltee Pen has extra information, songs and sound effects. There are also suggested investigative activities for the children to carry out hands-on experimentation. This provides an all-rounded learning experience – visual, audio and kinesthetic.

In addition, the Children’s Atlas enhances their knowledge in Geography and different cultures. A tap of Eltee Pen on the icon would play the national anthem of the country, so interesting! The children learn new vocabulary using Children’s Dictionary. Not too worry if you are not sure how to pronounce certain words, as Eltee Pen would do a great job!

Ability – A Time for Math
Through this multimedia program, the children build a strong foundation in Mathematics in a fun way. The program cover Numbers & Counting, Measurement, Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication and Division. The concepts are introduced through stories, games and songs using story books, activity books, Eltee Pen and CD-ROMs.
I read the story books with the children, and ask them questions from the books, then they use Eltee Pen to check whether their answers are correct.
My children are particularly interested in playing the board games and the card game, which strength their addition and subtraction concepts.
Attitude – Lifetime Values

It is not meaningful to be the most knowledgeable person who does not have good character. One way to introduce positive values to the children is through storytelling. Through reading with the children or using Eltee Pen, the children learn about moral values like honesty, caring, and sharing. The colourful illustrations are attractive, and the children are engaged through the dramatisation and music from Eltee Pen.

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