Posts found under: Phonics

Teaching Phonics to Children?

Image result for phonics

Phonics is a necessary part of any good method of teaching children to read. Teaching Children phonics and helping them develop phonemic awareness is the key to mastering words, which is the first key step toward successful reading. Children need to develop a knowledge of the letters, the sounds represented by the letters, and the connection between sounds created by combining the letters where words are formed. This is an essential part of mastering reading, and enabling children to become independent readers. By learning phonics and phonemic awareness, children gain the ability to pronounce new words, develop clear articulation, improve spelling, and develop self confidence.

When it comes to teaching your children to read, it must include three basic principles:

1) Reading for the child, whether it’s a word, sentence, or story, must appeal to your child’s interests.

2) Never pressure or force your child into reading, turning it into a negative “event” in their life. It should be a fun, enjoyable, and rewarding experience. This will take ample amounts of patience on the part of the parents, and some creativity.

3) Teaching your child to read must begin with the mastery of the phonemes – the individual sounds which makeup the words.

The basic process of teaching phonics and phonemic awareness to children includes teaching them the letters and letter sounds; then you teach the child to combine (or blend) various letter sounds together to form words; which is then followed by reading sentences and simple stories. This is a logical progression for children to learn reading, where they develop accuracy in decoding words and pronouncing words. This method of teaching also helps the child to spell correctly. Gradually, the different elements of phonics are combined to produce new words, and leads to the discovery of new words by the child using this process which becomes an “automatic reflex”.

Teaching phonics to children should take 10 to 15 minutes each day, and these “lessons” should take place in several small sessions each day – such as 4 or 5 session lasting 3 to 5 minutes each. For older pre-school children, lessons can be slightly longer; however, several minutes each session is all that’s needed.

One way to start teaching phonics to children with with ear training – by helping them develop the understanding that words are made up of smaller units of sounds, or known as phonemes, and when you combine these sounds, a word is formed. You can start this with very short sessions, as already mentioned. A few minutes a day is all that you need. The key, however, is consistency and patience.

During these short sessions, sound out words slowly and distinctly. You can do this without even making the child aware that you are trying to teach them. Simply take words from your everyday speaking to your child and include oral blending sounds into your sentences. For example, if you wanted to ask your child to drink his milk, you could say: “Joe, d-r-i-n-k your m-ilk.” The words drink and milk are sounded out slowly and distinctly. The level of sound separation can be set by you to increase or lower the difficulty. Thus, if Joe has a tough time figuring out that d-r-i-n-k means drink, you can lower the difficulty by blending the word as dr-ink instead.

Alternatively, you could simply pick different words and play blending sounds games with your child. You simply say the sounds of the word slowly, and ask the child try to guess what you are saying.

This concept of individual sounds forming words may take some time for your child to grasp. Some children will pick it up quickly, while other children may take longer, but one thing that’s certain is that if you keep it up, your child will catch on. Below are some sample words which you can use to play blending sounds activities with your child.

J-u-m-p   J-ump
R-u-n   R-un
S-i-t   S-it
S-t-a-n-d   St-and
M-i-l-k   M-ilk
S-t-o-p   St-op

The first word is more segmented than the second word, and will be more difficult to sound out. Please note that hyphens are used to indicate the letter sounds instead of slashes.

ie: J-u-m-p  /J/ /u/ /m/ /p/

This is done to make things easier to read; however, when you read it, you should not read the names of the letters, but instead say the sounds of the letters. This type of ear training for phonics and phonemic awareness should continue throughout the teaching process, even well after your child have grasped this concept. It can be applied to words with increasing difficulty. Again, please always keep in mind that not all children can readily blend the sounds to hear the word, so you must be patient, and drill this for days, weeks, or even months if needed. Consistency and frequency is the key to success here, and not sporadic binge sessions.

Request for a Free Presentation for our Phonics Program 

Share Button
Read more...

What is Early literacy

Picture2

Early literacy is what children know about reading and writing before they can read or write.

So, we know that early childhood is a critical stage in a child’s learning life, so how do teach them what they need to know?  Well, what they need are Early Literacy Skills.

We are not trying to teach children to read, but we’re giving them the tools they will need to be ready to learn when they go to school.

Teaching these skills begins at birth.  And as we saw earlier, it is important for kids to start Kindergarten already having these skills.

One of the way is to use —Print Awareness.This is noticing print everywhere, knowing how to handle a book, and knowing how we follow the words on a page.

—Some ways to teach print awareness:

◦Let children turn the pages in a book.

◦Occasionally, follow the words you are reading on a page with your finger.

◦Point out “environmental print” which are words on signs, cereal boxes, etc.

—It is more important for the reading experience to be positive than it is to read for a specific amount of time each day.

Learn more our Education Program here. 

Share Button
Read more...

Tips to improve your child vocabulary

developing-vocabulary-RAR-300x296

  • Read out aloud to your toddler

Sit your child down and read him a story out loud. Involve your child in the reading process by letting them turn the pages. Show them pictures in the book. Keep on asking questions on what they think might happen next. This practice will help them to connect specific words with what they see in the picture book as well as improve your toddler’s vocabulary.

  • Have conversation with them

Ask your child questions, if you leave her at the daycare then you might be able to ask her what she did at the daycare that day. If grandma takes care of her while you’re off to work, then ask what she and grandma did all day long. Allow her time to think about her answer and do not correct her even if she says something that is not quite correct. You do not want to lower her self-esteem when it comes to speaking. Low self-esteem is a big setback when it comes to trying to improve your toddler’s vocabulary.

  • Get them to ‘show and tell’( Story telling)

Take your toddler to a park, a beach or downstairs play area. Have her collect some items wherever you go. Let her bring them to you and then ask her to name them for you. You can say the word out loud and ask her to repeat it after you. Make it fun, by adding in descriptions and incorporating the show and tell items into imaginative tales.

  • No baby talk to your child

Children will often revert back to ‘baby talk’ because it’s comfortable and familiar. It takes too long to learn the proper words. Don’t let this happen. There is only so long that they should be speaking in baby talk. Just remember that you are on a mission to improve your toddler’s vocabulary!

  • Use Picture reading technique from a book

Use a book with pictures of common objects such as toys, food, clothing and furniture; arrange them all by category. Show the picture of the object and point to the actual item for your child. Then ask her to name the object and describe it.

  • Learn a new Word each day for your child

Pick a vocabulary word and explain what it means to your toddler. Encourage your child to use that word as many times as possible. Make a game out of it or reward them every time they use it appropriately. These are the building blocks that enable your toddler to speak properly and help you to improve your toddler’s vocabulary.

Request a Free Presentation on our program here.

Share Button
Read more...

How to teach Phonics?

phonics-and-teaching-activities-3-728

Teaching children to read by teaching phonics activities is a lot like doing math, where you have to know what the numbers are, how to count, and you need to learn to add and subtract before learning to multiply and divide. Teaching phonics to children is no different where you follow a step by step approach by first teaching the child the alphabet letters and phonics sounds, and then teaching them the combination of different letters to create different words, and using words to form sentences. It is a very logical and sequential buildup of phonics knowledge and reading ability.

Before a child can learn to read, he or she must first learn the alphabet letters, and know the sounds represented by the letters. It’s usually easier to teach some consonants and short vowels first before moving on to more complicated things such as consonant digraphs (2 consonants formed to produce one sound, such as “ch” or “ph”) and long vowels. As you can see, teaching children to read by the phonics method helps them develop phonemic awareness, and it is also a very logical and straight forward approach.

Start off by teaching your child the phonics sounds. You can choose to teach your child in alphabetic order going from A to Z, or you can teach several commonly used consonant sounds and vowels, and go from there. For example, you may start teaching your child /a/, /c/, and /t/ (slashes denote sound of the letters). Once your child has learn to quickly recognize these letters and properly sound out their sounds, you can then teach them to blend /c/, /a/, /t/ to make the words “cat”, or “tac”, or “at”.

As you introduce more letters and phonics sounds in your lesson plans, you can generate more words, and slowly introduce short, simple sentences to your reading lessons. Depending on the age of your child, I would suggest keeping the phonics lessons relatively short – around 5 to 10 minutes. Sometimes, just 3 to 5 minutes for a short lesson is plenty, and you can easily teach these short phonics lessons 2 or 3 times each day for a total of 10 to 15 minutes. Young children tend to be forgetful, so repetition is very important.

You don’t want to make the lessons too long and boring, that the child begins to feel like doing a “chore” when learning to read. So keep it short, fun, and interesting. By keeping the phonics lessons short, you also avoid overwhelming the child with too much information, and always remember to make sure your child has mastered one lesson before moving on to new material. Confusion and uncertainty will only make their learning effort difficult and frustrating – so review often, move on to new material only after they’ve mastered the current lessons.

So when can you start teaching phonics sounds and lessons to children? Not everyone will agree with me on this, but I believe that if your child can speak, then your child can learn to read. Of course, every child is different and unique, and some children will be more receptive to learning reading than others. One thing for certain, is that the earlier a child learns to read, the better.

If you would like to learn more about the simple, effective, step-by-step method of teaching phonics you can request a Free Presentation here.

Share Button
Read more...

Why teach phonics?

why teach phonics?

This is not to say that you should not teach your child phonics. Teaching whole words is never meant to replace a phonics‐based approach to reading.

Why teach phonics?
Whether or not a child learns some first words by sight, there will come a point when she needs to know the sounds made by the letters of the alphabet. In order to progress to the level of a competent reader (with a vocabulary of 50‐75,000 words), the ability to sound out new words is a must.
Around the world, whenever phonics is removed from the reading curriculum, literacy rates go down.

Holistic readers are indeed handicapped by the way they are taught to read. They are taught to look at words as whole pictures, which means that they are not bound to look at a word from left to right. They simply look for something in the word‐picture that will remind them of what the word is. Thus they may actually look at a word from right to left, which accounts for the tendency of dyslexics to
reverse letters and read words backwards.

Phonics lessons have also been shown to work wonders for children beginning school with poor reading skills. In 2005, psychologists Rhona Johnston and Joyce Watson published the results of a seven‐year longitudinal study into the reading abilities of Scottish schoolchildren. Comparing a group of first graders in a phonics based reading program to two groups enrolled in whole‐language programs, they concluded:

At the end of the 16‐week training period, the [phonics] group was reading words around 7 months ahead of chronological age, and was 7 months ahead of the other two groups.

The [phonics] group’s spelling was also 7 months ahead of chronological age, and was around 8 to 9 months ahead of the two [other] groups.

These groups were spelling 2 to 3 months behind chronological age. The [phonics] group also showed a significant advantage in ability to identify phonemes in spoken words.

Whole language is often pitted against phonics – but that needn’t be the case. You and your child can enjoy what each have to offer. Since your child will naturally learn her first words by sight, you can take advantage of the time when her memory is at its most powerful to teach her a large numbers of sight words. You will be amazed at how smart your baby is, as she begins showing that she can read,even before she is able to talk.

At age two or even younger, you can introduce your child to phonics. Play letter games with him, building words and asking him to see if he can. Sound out any real as well as nonsense words you each build. Most toddlers love word games of this sort, and find the sounds of the nonsense words particularly hilarious!

Once your child becomes a skilled reader, she will naturally blend her knowledge of spellings and sounds to make reading most efficient. The strengthening of the neural pathways for reading, and knowledge of whole words gained in babyhood will always be an asset.

Request for a Free Presentation on Magic Phonic here

 

Share Button
Read more...
  • Share…

  • Parent Testimonial

  • Contact Us