Posts found under: child

What is Early literacy

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Early literacy is what children know about reading and writing before they can read or write.

So, we know that early childhood is a critical stage in a child’s learning life, so how do teach them what they need to know?  Well, what they need are Early Literacy Skills.

We are not trying to teach children to read, but we’re giving them the tools they will need to be ready to learn when they go to school.

Teaching these skills begins at birth.  And as we saw earlier, it is important for kids to start Kindergarten already having these skills.

One of the way is to use —Print Awareness.This is noticing print everywhere, knowing how to handle a book, and knowing how we follow the words on a page.

—Some ways to teach print awareness:

◦Let children turn the pages in a book.

◦Occasionally, follow the words you are reading on a page with your finger.

◦Point out “environmental print” which are words on signs, cereal boxes, etc.

—It is more important for the reading experience to be positive than it is to read for a specific amount of time each day.

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Things Your Child Needs to Know Before Kindergarten

Have you ever wondered what exactly your child needs to know before kindergarten?

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Please keep in mind as you look over this list that  kids learn best with hands-on experiences, not memorization or drill practice! These early years with our children should be about fostering a love to play, explore, and learn!  Also, it is important to note that our children are all different and gifted in unique ways.  Obviously, if your child has special needs, exceptionalities, or is delayed in a particular area, this won’t necessarily be relevant to your child.  This is simply a guide…not something to stress about!

Personal and Social Development

Approach to learning

-Shows eagerness and curiosity as a learner

-Persists in task and seeks help when encountering a problem

-Is generally pleasant and cooperative

Self-Control

-Follows rules and routines

-Manages transitions (going from one activity to the next)

-Demonstrates normal activity level

Interactions with Others

-Interacts easily with one or more children

-Interacts easily with familiar adults

-Participates in group activities

-Plays well with others

-Takes turns and shares

-Cleans up after play

Conflict Resolution

-Seeks adult help when needed to resolve conflicts

-Uses words to resolve conflicts

Language and Literacy

Listening

-Listens with understanding to directions and conversations

-Follows one-step directions

-Follows two-step directions

Speaking

-Speaks clearly enough to be understood without contextual clues

-Relates experiences with some understanding of sequences of events

Literature and Reading

-Listens with interest to stories read aloud

-Shows interest in reading-related activities

-Retells information from a story

-Sequences three pictures to tell a logical story

Writing

-Uses pictures to communicate ideas

-Uses scribbles, shapes, and letter-like symbols to write words or ideas

Alphabet Knowledge

-Recites/sings alphabet

-Matches upper-case letters

-Matches lower-case letters

-Identifies upper-case letters

-Identifies lower-case letters

Mathematical Thinking

Patterns and Relationships

-Sorts by color, shape, and size

-Orders or seriates several objects on the basis of one attribute

-Recognizes simple patterns and duplicates them

Number concept and operations

-Rote counts to 20

-Counts objects with meaning to 10

-Matches numerals

-Identifies by naming, numerals 0-10

Geometry and spatial relations

-Identifies 4 shapes- circle, square, rectangle, triangle

-Demonstrates concepts of positional/directional concepts (up/down, over/under, in/out, behind/in front of, beside/between, top/bottom, inside/outside, above/below, high/low, right/left, off/on, first/last, far/near, go/stop).

Measurement

-Shows understanding of and uses comparative words (big/little, large/small, short/long, tall/short, slow/fast, few/many, empty/full, less/more.

Physical Development

Gross-Motor Skills

-Pedals and steers a tricycle

-Jumps in place, landing on two feet

-Jumps consecutively- 7 jumps

-Balances on one foot for 5 seconds

-Hops on one foot 2-3 hops

-Hops on one foot- 6 ft.

-Throws a ball with direction- 5 ft.

-Catches a thrown ball with arms and body

Climbs a playground ladder

-Skips smoothly for 20 feet

Fine-Motor Skills

-Stacks 10, one-inch blocks

-Strings 4 1/2″ beads in two minutes

-Completes a seven piece interlocking puzzle

-Makes a pancake, snake, and ball from playdough

-Grasps pencil correctly

-Copies:  vertical line, horizontal line, circle, cross, square, V, triangle

-Copies first name

-Prints first name without a model

-Grasps scissors correctly

-Cuts within 1/4″ of a 6″ straight line on construction paper

-Cuts out a 3″ square on construction paper

-Cuts out a 3″ triangle on construction paper

-Cuts out a 3″ circle on construction paper

-Uses a glue stick appropriately

-Uses appropriate amount of glue for tasks

The Arts

Creative Arts

-Identifies 10 colors:  red, yellow, blue, green, orange, purple, black, white, brown, pink

-Uses a variety of art materials for tactile experience and exploration

Music/Movement

-Participates in group music experiences

-Participates in creative movement/dance

Creative Dramatics

-Makes believe with objects

-Takes on pretend roles and situations

Do you agree with this list?  Is there anything that needs to be added (or taken away) based on your experience???

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How to teach Phonics?

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Teaching children to read by teaching phonics activities is a lot like doing math, where you have to know what the numbers are, how to count, and you need to learn to add and subtract before learning to multiply and divide. Teaching phonics to children is no different where you follow a step by step approach by first teaching the child the alphabet letters and phonics sounds, and then teaching them the combination of different letters to create different words, and using words to form sentences. It is a very logical and sequential buildup of phonics knowledge and reading ability.

Before a child can learn to read, he or she must first learn the alphabet letters, and know the sounds represented by the letters. It’s usually easier to teach some consonants and short vowels first before moving on to more complicated things such as consonant digraphs (2 consonants formed to produce one sound, such as “ch” or “ph”) and long vowels. As you can see, teaching children to read by the phonics method helps them develop phonemic awareness, and it is also a very logical and straight forward approach.

Start off by teaching your child the phonics sounds. You can choose to teach your child in alphabetic order going from A to Z, or you can teach several commonly used consonant sounds and vowels, and go from there. For example, you may start teaching your child /a/, /c/, and /t/ (slashes denote sound of the letters). Once your child has learn to quickly recognize these letters and properly sound out their sounds, you can then teach them to blend /c/, /a/, /t/ to make the words “cat”, or “tac”, or “at”.

As you introduce more letters and phonics sounds in your lesson plans, you can generate more words, and slowly introduce short, simple sentences to your reading lessons. Depending on the age of your child, I would suggest keeping the phonics lessons relatively short – around 5 to 10 minutes. Sometimes, just 3 to 5 minutes for a short lesson is plenty, and you can easily teach these short phonics lessons 2 or 3 times each day for a total of 10 to 15 minutes. Young children tend to be forgetful, so repetition is very important.

You don’t want to make the lessons too long and boring, that the child begins to feel like doing a “chore” when learning to read. So keep it short, fun, and interesting. By keeping the phonics lessons short, you also avoid overwhelming the child with too much information, and always remember to make sure your child has mastered one lesson before moving on to new material. Confusion and uncertainty will only make their learning effort difficult and frustrating – so review often, move on to new material only after they’ve mastered the current lessons.

So when can you start teaching phonics sounds and lessons to children? Not everyone will agree with me on this, but I believe that if your child can speak, then your child can learn to read. Of course, every child is different and unique, and some children will be more receptive to learning reading than others. One thing for certain, is that the earlier a child learns to read, the better.

If you would like to learn more about the simple, effective, step-by-step method of teaching phonics you can request a Free Presentation here.

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How to teach your baby to speak?

Baby speak

 

 

Babies absorb so much in the first few years of life. It is amazing what an impact everything you do has on an infant. With infants, it can sometimes be hard to tell what they are taking in because they cannot yet communicate with words. Teaching a baby to speak is fundamentally important for their development.

Talk to them all the time. As you change them, tell them what you are doing, and always speak in a soft, calming voice. Go through each step of everything you do with them. It may seem strange to say, “Now, I am taking off your diaper. I see you’re wet.” or, “Look at this nice big bowl of applesauce! Doesn’t it look yummy?” But babies respond to it, even if it may be hard to see it.

Watch your baby’s responses. When you talk to them, pause, as you would in a normal conversation, and give them time to respond. Sometimes they may smile, babble, or giggle, or sometimes they may just make a face or sit there and watch you. Either way, you are showing them the pattern of communication that they will use later on in life.

Read to them at least once a day. Show them the pictures and point out things in the pictures that go along with the story. Even if you are just reading a baby book of words, point out the picture of the ball, or the cat. They identify with things they can see. They make the connection between the words spoken and the pictures they see. Even taking objects that they are familiar with and speaking the name of the object will enhance their vocabulary, and make important connections between words and the world around them.

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Early Reading Habits That Make Young Kids Love Books

Reading Habit

How parents read to babies, toddlers, and preschoolers can have a huge impact on how much they love reading and how readily they learn to read on their own one day. Here, simple steps you can take at bedtime tonight.

Read books with rich illustrations

The least helpful types of books for children under age 5: ones with simple photos illustrations €”and minimal text. Compared with illustrated books, these don’€™t trigger as many conversation starters, which are critical to child development.

Ask questions based on the illustrations

Children between 16 and 24 months add more words to their vocabularies on a daily basis than they do at any other age, says Morrison. The first and easiest words to learn and label from book illustrations are nouns like “dog” and “tree,” she says. If you see a picture of a dog, ask your toddler or preschooler such questions as “Do you see the dog?” “What color is the dog?” “What is the dog doing?” This base knowledge of nouns helps children add the other parts of speech more quickly.

Cuddle your child in your arms while reading

This helps your child associate reading with feeling close and comfortable. This will eventually help your child become more confident with reading out loud.

Share the obvious

Point out things about books that you may take for granted as an adult. Share the author’s name and describe what an author does, show your child how to hold a book, demonstrate how sentences are read from left to right, and what it’s like to turn the pages. Knowing these basic reading steps will make it easier for young children to read independently when they ’re ready.

Relate plots to real life

Ask open-ended questions (who, what, where, and why) to children age 3 and older to open a dialogue of storytelling. Relating a book ’s plot to a real-life situation your child has experienced helps her better remember the book and vocabulary words.

Use reading to spark conversation

It i€™s actually not important that you finish the entire book; what really matters is the nature of conversation you have during reading. A parent who readily responds to questions (even if they seem never-ending!) and has a back-and-forth style of talking with her child will help develop their kid’s cognitive skills and social development in the real world. Ask questions based on the illustrations and let the conversation flow from there.

Don’t be afraid to imitate voices or make silly sounds

Wham! Bang! Mooooo! These onomatopoeias may feel embarrassing to say, but your child needs to hear them (and will adore seeing your silly side). The variety of sounds and voices act as an early literacy skill that will eventually lead to your child recognizing phonemes, or the sound units that make up larger words, says Morrison. Recognizing and hearing these sound units help your children to speak full words.

Follow your child attention

If you force your child to sit still and read, he’ll come to think of reading as a punishment. Instead, go with the flow of your child’s attention span. When he loses interest he may run around the room a bit, but come back to the book in a few minutes. Don’t give up when your child runs away or gets bored. Keep reading and commenting on the story to yourself; often he’ll circle back to you out of curiosity.

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Raise a Child Who Loves to Read

Raise a Reader LearningTech

Raise a Child Who Loves to Read

1. Read to your child from the earliest age.

And not just at bedtime. Buy board books and cloth books as some of your child’s first toys. Carry them around with snacks in the diaper bag. Create “cozy time,” a ritual of connection in which you both associate love and cuddling with reading. Any time either of you needs a break, grab a book and read to your child. Post tantrum, during lunch, after school, while you have your coffee on Sunday, any time can be cozy time.

2. Begin visiting the library regularly

…by the time your child is two and she may well prefer reading to any other activity. Use the time in the library to read to your child as well as to select books. My kids would never sit still at library “story times,” but if your child likes them, by all means go. Write down the names of the books you check out if your library can’t give you a printout, so you can keep track of returning them on time. Keep library books on a separate shelf in the living room or kitchen so you don’t lose them, and so you can always easily find something new to read. (If you don’t take them out of the house, you won’t lose them.)

Supervising a toddler and perusing bookshelves is always a challenge; it helps if you can develop a list of authors and books so you can find good ones easily. Librarians usually have a list of favorite books for various ages, and other parents and kids are always a good source of suggestions.

3. Read to your child as often as possible.

Children could really participate in meals, reading to them during lunch or an early dinner (when the other parent isn’t yet home from work) entertained them enough to keep them sitting.  This is very different from putting kids in front of a screen while they eat. Then, they stare at the screen as they unconsciously put things in their mouth. Being read to is more like listening to the radio; they can look at their food and savor it as they listen, glancing occasionally at the pictures you hold up.

4. Don’t push your child to learn to read.

Most children learn to read naturally once they develop the preliminary skills. Your goal is not to help him sound out words, but to encourage a love of books, both pictures and stories. Teaching him to read may take all the fun out of reading. If you push him, he’ll feel put on the spot, and he’ll feel dumb. That feeling will last his whole life, and it won’t help him like reading.

If you notice that your child seems to have a hard time recognizing letters, or confuses letters, or can’t sound out words, or can’t recognize words that he has seen many times before, it is possible that he has a learning difference such as dyslexia. Discuss your concern with your child’s school and ask to speak to their learning specialist, who should be experienced in diagnosis and early intervention.

5. Don’t stop reading to him once he learns to read.

Read to him every step of the way, for as long as he’ll let you. Continuing to read to him will keep him interested as his skills develop. And it gives you lots of fodder for conversations about values and choices.

Parents often complain that their early readers CAN read, but just don’t seem interested in doing so. Most kids go through this stage, but you can help to keep it a brief one. The child’s problem, of course, is that he can read simple books, but his imagination craves more developed plots and characters. Those books are agonizing work, with too many words he doesn’t know, and the labor distracts him from the story. He needs his parents to keep reading to him, to keep him fascinated with the secrets of books and motivated to become a proficient reader.

At this vulnerable stage, it is well worth the extra time to track down books he can read and will find exciting. Picture books with lots of words work well, since he can use the pictures to help him stay interested and figure out the words. Soon, through his work in school, as well as the books he picks up at home, his reading skills will catch up with his appetite for books. Within a few months, he’ll be able to handle simple chapter books. At that point, look for series books, which often lure kids on to the next book and the next.

6. Ritualize daily reading time.

Set up a “cozy reading time” every day. This can be a perfect chill-out time after school, or after lunch in the summer, or a wind-down time at the end of the evening. It’s amazing how motivated kids are to read if this allows them to stay up a little later. We negotiated a half hour later bedtime that our first graders were ready for anyway, as long as it was spent in bed reading a book.

Some six year olds are just so tired by the end of the day, however, that reading is simply too much work for them then. Until your child is ready for bedtime reading, try setting up his cozy reading time while you make dinner, after homework is done. The only downside to this is that you’ll need to scrape out a half hour to start him off at what is probably your busiest time of the day.

7. Help her tackle the next level.

Pick a book she can read, but that is a bit harder than she might choose on her own — a simple chapter book, rather than a picture book, for example. Read together until you have to answer the phone or start dinner, but a minimum of a quarter of the book, so your child is hooked. Then tell her it’s time for her read-alone time. It’s her choice. Does she want to keep reading the book you’ve just gotten her into, or read something else? Most kids grab the book and finish it themselves. (If she doesn’t, you may need to drop back a level to a slightly simpler book.) Keep choosing engrossing, slightly harder books.

8. Help him improve his reading by alternating pages with him

…during your read-aloud time. But if he stumbles, supply the word. Don’t make him stop and sound things out; your goal is to keep him excited about the book by moving forward with the story. I recommend this only for limited periods of time – it tires kids out — and I recommend that you not be rigid about enforcing your child’s participation (in other words, have them do every third page, or fourth). If you take the fun out of reading with him, you’ve done more harm than good.

9. Try smart comics for reluctant readers.

Some kids get a terrific jump start from comics, which are less intimidating to them than chapter books.

10. Never stop reading to her.

But why give up such an important time to connect with each other emotionally? Why give up the chance to read books that trigger good discussions about values and choices and hardships and hope? Don’t stop till she fires you.

11. Read yourself.

Role model. If they don’t see you read, why should they? Discuss what you’re all reading at the dinner table. Institutionalize family reading time, when a parent reads to the whole family. As kids get older, they can take over the role of reader, or the book can be passed around the circle.

12. Limit technology.

There is no way a book can compete with TV or computer. Most kids, given the choice, just won’t choose the book often enough to make it a habit. Before you know it, they’ll have developed other habits for relaxing, and reading will be something other people do. Limiting or even banning screen usage until reading is well-established may be the most important thing you can do to encourage reading.

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How to encourage your child to Read?

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Encouraging Your Child to Read.

  • Read and reread your young child’s favorite books every day. Reading books with rhymes helps develop a child’s awareness of the sounds in our language, an ability that is often associated with reading success in the early grades. If you have ever read “Green Eggs and Ham ”, you will always remember the repetitive refrain, “I do not like green eggs and ham. I do not like them Sam I am.” Young children also delight in predictable books with memorable refrains.
  • Read books with a variety of characters. All children should have the opportunity to read books with characters that look and speak like them. At the same time, children also enjoy reading stories about fantastic characters, such as talking animals that stimulate their imagination and build on their love of pretend play.
  • Enjoy rhyming books together. Children enjoy books with rhyming patterns. Young children find the use of nonsense rhymes playful and fun. As you read, invite your child to fill in some of the rhyming words.
  • As you read, point out the important features of a book. Before you start reading, show your child the title and author on the front of the book. You might say, “The title of this book is ‘Amazing Grace’. It is written by Mary Hoffman and the pictures are by Caroline Birch.”
  • As you read, point to each word with your finger. This demonstrates to your child that there is a one-to-one match between the spoken and written word. It also draws your child’s attention to the link between the words you say and the words on the page. Pointing as you read also reinforces the concept that we read from top to bottom and from the left to the right.
  • Use stories to introduce your child to new words. Focusing on new vocabulary words increases reading comprehension. You can promote your child’s vocabulary development by drawing his attention to new or unusual words in the story. It’s important to just have fun with these new words and help your child use them in real-life situations. After learning “capsize” in a story, you can point out that the toy boat in your child’s bath has capsized and the animals are now in the water.

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What reading does to your child?

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Reading alone expands a child’s world. By reading, a child can be transported to other times and places, which he would not be able to be, by just reading. History textbooks give facts, but historical stories have the power to make us feel as if we are living in that exact same setting.

Through reading, your child can imagine the life in the future, or on a distant planet. Books help us to consider the impossible situations and realise the many choices that we have in life. It builds a sense of wonder in your child.

Reading also allows us to live more lives than the one we have. While reading, we can face fear and loneliness without leaving the safety of our home. We’re able to sail around the world without fear of shipwreck, suffer blindness without loss of sight, while still feeling the emotions of the moment. Through reading, we can also feel the experiences that we may have someday.

Books cannot replace a real life experience, but they are useful to help us decide which experiences are worth having in the future

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Early Bilingual Program Review by Chill Mom

As a non-Chinese reader myself, I never knew which Chinese book to get for my children. I’m certainly not capable of reading it to them either.

I’m also eager to expose them to the language at an early age. It would be a little too late to leave it to pre-school. Languages are after all, easier for children to learn. The younger they are, the better.

Which is why I’m quite excited to share my review of the Early Bilingual Program by Learning Tech with you today. It is engaging, fun and very comprehensive for children from the age of 2 to 6. Because it has both English and Chinese translation on the same page, I find myself learning alongside Lauren and Georgia. And oh, I don’t have to buy other chinese books anymore, at least not for the next 3 years.

As you can see, the whole program contains many things. Here is my review of each component of the Early Bilingual Program.

Story Books

All 28 books in the program are audio enabled, making the stories come alive for small children. The books are beautifully illustrated. Lauren calls each book by the colour of the cover. Her favourite is the Mini Teddy Book 8 with the blue cover. Each book contains 2 short and very simple stories, and a sing-a-long song/rhyme at the end of each story.

For example, the first story of Mini Teddy Book 8 tells the story of Puppy who goes into the woods with his cart one day and finds Kitty’s comb, Teddy’s life ring and Nicky the Mouse’s roly-poly. He puts them into his cart and returns the items to each of his friends. His friends are very grateful and thank Puppy.

The story is told in English and Chinese through the reader. You can point the reader onto the page number to have the story read in English or point it on each sentences to repeat the lines in either Chinese on English.

You can also point to the objects mentioned in the story (in this case, the cart and the life ring) and the reader names the object too.

 The reader makes such an excellent independent reading tool. I didn’t have to sit with the kids and they can have the whole book read out to them by the reader.

The books teaches basic phonics. Children are exposed to 48 different conversation topics and 64 English rhymes.I like to sneak in a little read with Lauren and Georgia just before their daily Hi-5 show on television.

Mini Books

These 2 books are probably the most used books out of the whole program. You can see after just 1 month, the corners are already all tattered because I bring them everywhere we go. I like that both books are small enough to fit into my handbag.We read them during car rides, flights and while we wait for the food in the restaurant. I’m at a risk of sounding like a tiger mum here but the reader makes it fun for Lauren to learn the objects names in Chinese and English.

You will find 500 English vocabulary and Chinese characters in one book and the other one focuses primarily in Chinese characters and Han Yu Pin Yin. Each word is clearly illustrated.

Flash Cards

After going through the Chinese mini book, you can then test your child with the flash cards set. Your child can learn 300 English vocabulary and Chinese characters with these cards. It has illustrations with Chinese and English words on one side; Chinese characters, hanyu pinyin, and a Chinese sentence using those word(s) on the other side.
You can flip it over. Show your child the Chinese characters only (no pictures) and see if they are able to recognise them. English transalation is available in small print at the lower right corner for parents to refer to.
Through these flash cards, a child can learn 25 different themes ranging from clothings to family members to antonyms.

Activity books and CDs

We also receive a set of 5 activities books in Chinese. It is suitable for kids aged 3 to 8 years old. I’ve only started Lauren on the first book. Some of the activities are quite simple, while some required some logical and sequence thinking. I haven’t gotten her started on the harder ones yet. Once she can understand more complex instructions, I can’t wait to see how she tackles those questions.

Animation DVDs

 

All the stories told in the Mini Teddy and Hello Teddy story books are available in animation, so the children can see the stories come alive too.

Audio CDs

All the rhymes and songs from the books are also available in audio CDs. There are also stories from the various titles. Great for car rides.

Dinasour encyclopedia, CD and toys set

We also received a Chinese dinosaur encyclopedia, CD and toys with the program. I haven’t started on the book yet because everything is in Chinese. My girls haven’t shown any interest in dinosaurs either. But if you have boys who love dinosaurs, I’m sure they’ll be excited with this. I like the cool toy that transforms from an egg into a dinosaur.

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Why Smart Kids Fail??

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Average kids from average homes received 432 negative statements as opposed to 32 positive statements daily.

Words such as “Don’t touch that.” “No, it is done this way” “No, you are not big enough.”

The Best way to help a  smart kids be more confident is to use more Positive words to the child

Here is a list of 15 encouraging words and phrases that will assist your child to keep trying and increase his self-esteem and confidence.

1. “I like the way you handled that”

2. “Wow, you really thought out the solution to that problem”

3. “I have faith in your ability”

4. “I appreciate what you did”

5. “You are really showing improvement”

6. “I know you will figure out a good way to do it next time”

7. “You don’t have to be perfect. Effort and improvement are important.”

8. “I trust you to be responsible”

9. “It must make you proud of yourself when you accomplish something like that”

10. “You are a valuable part of the team”

11. “It is okay to make a mistake, we all do. What do you think you learned from it?”

12. “How can we turn this into a positive?”

13. “I’m proud of you for trying”

14. “I’ll bet by next year you will be able to handle it, you just need to grow a little”

15. “I know you are disappointed that you didn’t win, but you’ll do better next time.”

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Child Reading milestone

reader milestones

Young children begin to recognize familiar words.Your young child may learn whole words that she can see, like STOP signs, before she learns individual letters. Young children may also learn logos and symbols, so, as they pass familiar restaurants, they may point out a known letter, such as “big M.”

Young children learn that stories have a clear structure and specific elements. As your young child listens to stories, he learns that all good stories have a beginning, middle, and end. He also learns to predict, based on the book cover, what the story will be about, as well as what might happen next or how the story will end. Young children learn that there are characters in stories and that the setting (where and when it takes place) is something that a listener would want to know. Your child will enjoy comparing the characters in a book to himself and to other real life people he knows.

Your young child may “pretend” to read. Children who have been read to frequently will pretend to read books to themselves or to their toy dolls and animals, using their own words or phrases from the story. Parents and caregivers may also observe young children incorporating pretend reading into their play—”reading” a recipe as they make a cake or “reading” a shopping list as they put groceries in their basket.

Young children become aware that the world is filled with letters. During the preschool years, many young children will be able to recite or sing the alphabet. They may begin to recognize familiar letters, especially letters in their own names, followed by letters from parents’, siblings’, and friends’ names. Finding familiar letters in their homes, at preschool, or in the grocery store is very exciting for young children, and they will let parents and caregivers know when “I found another big N!” or “Hey, there is the little t!”

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A Book Is a Child’s Companion

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If we want our children to enjoy the companionship of books, we must allow the child’s contribution to the relationship to be wholly salient. We want the child to know that he is relevant to the book. So as we look at a book with a child, we are flexible about how that process goes. We forget that we know it has a beginning, middle and end, and we allow the child’s pleasure and interest to dictate what it is to which we will attend, and of what the interaction will consist. We attend to the child’s agenda. We do our best to explicate the demands of perspective the illustration demonstrates, and we spend the time we need to cover and uncover, make disappear and reappear, our own faces and hands, until this loses its interest for the child. Only then do we proceed in the book. It is not unlike taking our child to the beach to view the vast ocean or to admire the sunset while acknowledging that the tiny sandcrab that scurries over the toe of his sneaker and totally captures his attention is a wholly worthy competitor for our intent and deserves our closest mutual attention. We are flexible, and we care about what our small friend’s interests are because only then can he bring his whole self to the encounter. And that is what we want. We want the child to know that he is relevant to the book.

Babies and toddlers are enriched by books. Even more important, the relationships between very young children and their parents are enriched by books. Books provide a source of mutual pleasure for parent and child that is likely to last a lifetime. We introduce infants and toddlers to books not simply because of what they will learn from them, but so that they will grow to love them. It is a gift beyond measure.

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Developing a Reading Habit!

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Here are a few tried-and-tested techniques to help get you started:

Before reading a book to your child, read it through once yourself to identify areas you might want to concentrate on.

Point at each word with your finger as you read, and encourage your child to follow along. Even before your child can read, they can be highly stimulated by the pictures they see in books.

A child’s attention span tends to be rather short, so choose simple books with plenty of colorful pictures.

If you are concerned about little hands tearing and smudging books, buy sturdy toddler board books that can withstand some ‘abuse’.

Parents who show that that they enjoy and benefit from reading will set good examples to their children.

Children are constantly imitating adults, so if you make reading out to be a fun and enjoyable activity, it is likely that your child will as well.

Make reading a treat instead of a chore! Don’t just read to your child at bedtime – read to him throughout the day or whenever time allows.

Show enthusiasm and excitement, and vary your reading tone to give characters different voices. Make your own puppets out of household items to use when reading.

Involve your child in the reading process. Let him turn the pages of the book, and give him adequate time to look at the pictures and ask questions.

If your child has developed an adequate level of reading comprehension, ask him simple questions about the story after each reading session.

Most children will have ‘favorites’. Read your child’s favorite books often, and make them available to your child at all times by placing them on a shelf within easy reach. This allows your child to look at his favoriteswhenever he desires.

All children have an innate desire to communicate. Write simple notes and letters to your child, and encourage him to do the same to you.

For children who have yet to master reading and writing, simply let them ‘read’ you their mental notes, and then read your notes to them.

Visit to your local library regularly, and engage the help of the children’s librarian to assist your child in choosing books that are appropriate for his age group.

When he is old enough, obtain a library card for your child. This will help him acquire a sense of responsibility alongside an interest of reading.

By making reading fun, and keeping your child’s reading experiences positive, you can nurture a child to grow into an avid reader, and one who views reading as an enjoyable pastime.

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10 reasons to read to your child!

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We all know that learning to read is important, but as parents what do we do to facilitate this milestone?

Reading to your child has many benefits one of which is simply having time to snuggle together.

Here are 10 reasons to read to your child.

1.When you read to your child, he/she will learn that reading is important to you, therefore reading will become important to him/her.

2.The more your child hears sounds, the better he/she will process these sounds into words. When a child is preschool/kindergarten age the listening word starts to become the written word.

3.Reading has a calming effect on a restless or fussy baby. Who doesn’t want an easy way to calm a fussy baby?

4.Reading is a wonderful before bed routine. Studies have shown that a child will thrive in an atmosphere in which routines are present.

5.Reading will help to develop your child’s imagination. Have you ever gotten lost in a good book? Your child can do the same while you are reading to him/her.

6.Reading will foster your child’s ability to listen and pay attention. With all the problems we here about concerning attention spans this is a great way to avoid that.

7.Reading to a young child will teach him/her the correct way to hold a book and turn the pages.

8.Reading to your child will develop in him/her the desire to become a reader.

9.Teachers will thank you

10.When a child is read a personalized story book, he/she will be able to recognize his/her name in print at an early age.

Isn’t it exciting to think that you can have such an effect on your child’s ability to read just by reading to him/her? You have the power to develop a life long joy of reading and learning in your child.

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Teach your child to read

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You can start teaching your child the building blocks for reading before they ever step foot in a classroom. Once your child enters school, you can work with your child and their teachers to help aid the learning process. Teaching your child to read will involve dedication and patience.
Make reading an important part of your child’s life before they can even speak. Read to your child as they develop in the womb and when they are babies. When your child is ready, start to read out loud to them while they follow along by looking at the pictures. You can then start to point out words in the book to your child while you read their favorite stories.

Read your children books with rhymes as well. The rhymes are easy for your child to remember and as they grow older they can learn to recognize some of the words in their favorite rhymes.

Start to introduce your baby to the alphabet from a young age. When your baby is just a couple months old you can start singing the ABC’s song to them. Between twelve to eighteen months, your little one will start to sing parts of the song on their own. A few months after that, you can start showing them the letters of the alphabet on a chart as you sing through the tune.

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Importance of Reading to Baby!

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Remember how you felt the first time your secret crush looked at you? That is nothing compared to your baby’s gaze at you. He looks at you in the eyes and you feel like you’re in heaven. You are then compelled to talk to him. It’s an automatic reaction. It is as if the baby is expecting you to interact with him. The truth is, your baby is really expecting something with that eye-contact!

In these moments, your “cootsie-coo” or the cute but utterly senseless “dah-dah-dah-dah,baby?” or “ ah- ba-ba-ba-ba…” babble, wouldn’t be enough. Of course, another way would be to make your baby giggle endlessly with your “peek-a-boo” However, you’re not waiting till your baby turns blue before you stop, are you?

The totally senseless sounds you make just to entertain your bundle of joy could only go on if you don’t mind being totally senseless for a longer period. Usually, it is you who gives up first. And the baby looks at you as if telling you not to stop pfizer viagra ligne. This is the time when you usually start talking to your baby with real words — This is where the story-telling comes in handy.

…. and then you read to your baby.

If you have been talking to your baby while he was still inside his mother’s womb, unbeknown to you, something almost magical is unfolding with this first time face-to-face talking and reading to your baby.

He remembers your voice!

According to the latest scientific findings, a developing fetus can hiccup and actually reacts to loud noises as early as on its ninth week. Your baby dreams, can taste the food that the mother eats, and he actually starts hearing by the end of the second trimester. In fact, he can distinguish the voices of his Mom from another person.

Research shows that a fetus’ heart rate slows down when his mother is speaking – this means he is calmed by the mother’s voice. Furthermore, the fetus responds to a familiar story (a story that has been repeatedly read to him while he’s inside the womb) and he prefers to listen to it over a new story read to him after birth.

Although there are no scientific findings to show that the baby appreciates the story that you read, reading to your baby (especially if you start while he is still inside his mother’s womb) becomes his first social encounter with you – this is your first bonding. Your voice becomes one of the first stimuli that he can identify with and connect to you. It would then become very important for the Mom to read aloud to the baby while he is inside the womb. Well, you can just talk but it would appear crazy, right? Besides, if you just ramble on, you might forget yourself and you might end up talking about something that pisses you off.

Here are some simple tips for reading to your baby:

• Pick a book that will become your baby’s favourite. Don’t worry if you find your baby prefers one single book read to him over and over. Don’t insist on introducing new ones if it is not welcomed. Babies learn by repetition. They may not even understand anything about it – they just love to hear the sound of your voice, and the familiarity of the words read to him. Pick a book that has simple, repetitive words. It would be better if the words rhyme, so you can read it in a sing-song voice.

• Pick a book with simple and large pictures of familiar objects against solid backgrounds. It would also help if it is one of those board books that could survive the baby’s hands, spit, and bites. You would also want to make sure it is always clean as the baby would always want to put it in his mouth.

• When reading, you don’t need to always start from the first page. You can immediately go to the baby’s favourite page (it might be because of the picture, or it might be because it is the part where your reading becomes very expressive – read with exaggerated voice expression; use different voices for different story characters; make animal sounds, or say “chug-chug-chug…tooot! toot!” when you’re reading about a train. You don’t have to finish the book in every sitting, too. Remember, the baby still does not understand the story.

• When reading, you don’t have to totally leave everything to what the author has written. You may interrupt the story every now and then to interact with the baby (this is specially so if the baby can already respond or point), e.g., “See? There’s goes the baby duck…Where’s the baby duck? Yes…that’s the baby duck. It goes, ‘quack! Quack’. What’s the sound of the duck?” Or point at the drawings or pictures and say, “This is the house. It is a red house…” etc.

The first five years of a human being’s life are a time of incredible growth and learning. Reading to your child gives him his first encounter with words, colors, numbers, letters and shapes. Constantly reading to your baby imprints these concepts in their minds. Reading becomes a part of your baby’s life. As months pass, notice how your baby behaves when he sees you holding his favourite book. He may even try to grab it from you, may help you flip the pages, point at objects, or he may even surprise you with a “Quack! Quack!” when he sees the duck.

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Intelligence Quotient vs Emotional Intelligence

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Intelligence Quotient

Advantages
  • An intelligent child might do well in professional career.
  • A smart child may perform well in academics and studies.
  • An academically skilled child is oriented towards a scholarly attitude.
Disadvantages
  • An intelligent child who is rich in IQ but poor in EQ may not be a successful person in leading a life free of tension and stress.
  • A child who is poor in emotional intelligence, may not understand others and in addition, he or she may not develop a sense of self-awareness.
  • A child that is poor in emotional skills may not develop social and emotional competence at all.

 

Emotional Intelligence
Advantages
  • An emotionally stable child has very good social skills and he or she can lead life free of stress, strain, pressure and deep emotions. In other words, mental health in such children may be very good.
  • An emotionally competent child can survive with greater societal challenges and strife.
  • An emotionally stronger child is adept in adjusting his or her life to changing situations and scenarios.
  • A child who has better emotion quotient can easily manage emotions in a better manner.
Disadvantages
  • A child who is poor in IQ may not be able to succeed in a professional world that demands academic and scholarly skills.
  • A child with poor IQ may find a traditional classroom very boring and difficult.
Any comparison should end here because a child of today’s world should be brought up with both of these intelligences. Both IQ and EQ are just like right and left eyes. One cannot exist without the other although EQ is still preferred a little higher. Emotional intelligence is often referred to as a “life saving skill” meaning it either makes or breaks the life of a person. Goleman, the noted proponent of EQ, discusses various factors that make up emotional intelligence.
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Why Smart Kids Fail?

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Average kids from average homes received 432 negative statements as opposed to 32 positive statements daily.

Words such as “Don’t touch that.” “No, it is done this way” “No, you are not big enough.”

The Best way to help a child be more confident is to use more Positive words to the child.
Here is a list of 15 encouraging words and phrases that will assist your child to keep trying and increase his self-esteem and confidence.

1. “I like the way you handled that”
2. “Wow, you really thought out the solution to that problem”
3. “I have faith in your ability”
4. “I appreciate what you did”
5. “You are really showing improvement”
6. “I know you will figure out a good way to do it next time”
7. “You don’t have to be perfect. Effort and improvement are important.”
8. “I trust you to be responsible”
9. “It must make you proud of yourself when you accomplish something like that”
10. “You are a valuable part of the team”
11. “It is okay to make a mistake, we all do. What do you think you learned from it?”
12. “How can we turn this into a positive?”
13. “I’m proud of you for trying”
14. “I’ll bet by next year you will be able to handle it, you just need to grow a little”
15. “I know you are disappointed that you didn’t win, but you’ll do better next time.”

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Our Whole Brain

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As parents, how can we help our children become better integrated so they can use their whole brain in a coordinated way? Here are a few suggestions:

  • Connect and Redirect. When your child is melting down or blowing up emotionally, avoid immediately appealing to his logic. Saying,“Why are you acting this way? I don’t have any snacks in the car” is problematic because it addresses an emotional, right-brain problem using rational, left-brain logic. Instead, connect first emotionally—right brain to right brain. By telling him, “I can tell that you’re really disappointed about the snacks” in a soothing tone of voice, you acknowledge his feelings in a calm manner. Then, once he is more in control and receptive, redirect by bringing in the left-brain lessons and, if necessary, setting some boundaries.
  • Name It to Tame It. When a scary or painful experience produces big, out-of-control emotions, don’t dismiss and deny them. Instead, help him tell the story of what happened. Telling a story helps his left brain make sense of all of those unfamiliar emotions that his right brain is experiencing, and this will help him to feel more in control. Storytelling allows both sides of the brain to work together, preventing disintegration.
  • Engage, Don’t Enrage. In high-stress situations, engage your child’s upstairs brain, which is where his higher-order thinking takes place. Rather than triggering the more primitive and reactive downstairs brain with the “Because I said so!” card, ask questions, collaborate, and even negotiate. The more you can appeal to the upstairs brain and engage him in critical thinking and processing, the more your child will think and act and decide, rather than simply reacting to what he’s feeling.
  • Get Active. If your child loses touch with his upstairs brain, help him regain balance by having him move his body. Doing a few jumping jacks or running around the yard can directly affect his brain chemistry. Exercise allows him to work through some of his emotions in a healthy way, allowing him to focus on other things afterward. When we change our physical state—through movement or relaxation, for example—we can change our emotional state.

These tips offer the possibility not only of surviving difficult parenting moments, but of actually turning them into times you can help your child thrive by tapping in to his whole brain. Survive and thrive. It really can happen, when you’re raising a whole-brain child.

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