Posts found under: parenting

What is Early literacy

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Early literacy is what children know about reading and writing before they can read or write.

So, we know that early childhood is a critical stage in a child’s learning life, so how do teach them what they need to know?  Well, what they need are Early Literacy Skills.

We are not trying to teach children to read, but we’re giving them the tools they will need to be ready to learn when they go to school.

Teaching these skills begins at birth.  And as we saw earlier, it is important for kids to start Kindergarten already having these skills.

One of the way is to use —Print Awareness.This is noticing print everywhere, knowing how to handle a book, and knowing how we follow the words on a page.

—Some ways to teach print awareness:

◦Let children turn the pages in a book.

◦Occasionally, follow the words you are reading on a page with your finger.

◦Point out “environmental print” which are words on signs, cereal boxes, etc.

—It is more important for the reading experience to be positive than it is to read for a specific amount of time each day.

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Teaching Moral Values

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If there is one desire that virtually all mothers and fathers share, it is the wish to raise a good child. But ask any dozen parents to define “good” and you are bound to get a dozen different answers. One parent cares strongly about manners and politeness. Another will cite responsibility and obedience to family rules as the essence of virtue. A third parent upholds self-control and cooperativeness as the most admirable of character traits, and fourth emphasizes such qualities as honesty, kindness and trustworthiness. But in truth, good behavior is all these things and more, and given the proper opportunity, your youngster will be able to make all of them a part of his own character.

As a loving parent, what strategies can you use to encourage character building? For one thing, you can give your child plenty of reasons to trust you and to feel secure in your care. For another, you can be a good role model, demonstrating the values and types of behavior you want him to adopt. You can also set reasonable limits and positive expectations, appropriate to his age and temperament. You can be firm, fair, consistent and loving disciplinarian without resorting to harsh punishment. And you can help him find his way within the larger community of friends, school and strangers – explaining, interpreting, guiding and lending a sympathetic ear as he meets each new social challenge. But you cannot make your child be good – that in end, is up to him.

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Tips to improve your child vocabulary

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  • Read out aloud to your toddler

Sit your child down and read him a story out loud. Involve your child in the reading process by letting them turn the pages. Show them pictures in the book. Keep on asking questions on what they think might happen next. This practice will help them to connect specific words with what they see in the picture book as well as improve your toddler’s vocabulary.

  • Have conversation with them

Ask your child questions, if you leave her at the daycare then you might be able to ask her what she did at the daycare that day. If grandma takes care of her while you’re off to work, then ask what she and grandma did all day long. Allow her time to think about her answer and do not correct her even if she says something that is not quite correct. You do not want to lower her self-esteem when it comes to speaking. Low self-esteem is a big setback when it comes to trying to improve your toddler’s vocabulary.

  • Get them to ‘show and tell’( Story telling)

Take your toddler to a park, a beach or downstairs play area. Have her collect some items wherever you go. Let her bring them to you and then ask her to name them for you. You can say the word out loud and ask her to repeat it after you. Make it fun, by adding in descriptions and incorporating the show and tell items into imaginative tales.

  • No baby talk to your child

Children will often revert back to ‘baby talk’ because it’s comfortable and familiar. It takes too long to learn the proper words. Don’t let this happen. There is only so long that they should be speaking in baby talk. Just remember that you are on a mission to improve your toddler’s vocabulary!

  • Use Picture reading technique from a book

Use a book with pictures of common objects such as toys, food, clothing and furniture; arrange them all by category. Show the picture of the object and point to the actual item for your child. Then ask her to name the object and describe it.

  • Learn a new Word each day for your child

Pick a vocabulary word and explain what it means to your toddler. Encourage your child to use that word as many times as possible. Make a game out of it or reward them every time they use it appropriately. These are the building blocks that enable your toddler to speak properly and help you to improve your toddler’s vocabulary.

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Things Your Child Needs to Know Before Kindergarten

Have you ever wondered what exactly your child needs to know before kindergarten?

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Please keep in mind as you look over this list that  kids learn best with hands-on experiences, not memorization or drill practice! These early years with our children should be about fostering a love to play, explore, and learn!  Also, it is important to note that our children are all different and gifted in unique ways.  Obviously, if your child has special needs, exceptionalities, or is delayed in a particular area, this won’t necessarily be relevant to your child.  This is simply a guide…not something to stress about!

Personal and Social Development

Approach to learning

-Shows eagerness and curiosity as a learner

-Persists in task and seeks help when encountering a problem

-Is generally pleasant and cooperative

Self-Control

-Follows rules and routines

-Manages transitions (going from one activity to the next)

-Demonstrates normal activity level

Interactions with Others

-Interacts easily with one or more children

-Interacts easily with familiar adults

-Participates in group activities

-Plays well with others

-Takes turns and shares

-Cleans up after play

Conflict Resolution

-Seeks adult help when needed to resolve conflicts

-Uses words to resolve conflicts

Language and Literacy

Listening

-Listens with understanding to directions and conversations

-Follows one-step directions

-Follows two-step directions

Speaking

-Speaks clearly enough to be understood without contextual clues

-Relates experiences with some understanding of sequences of events

Literature and Reading

-Listens with interest to stories read aloud

-Shows interest in reading-related activities

-Retells information from a story

-Sequences three pictures to tell a logical story

Writing

-Uses pictures to communicate ideas

-Uses scribbles, shapes, and letter-like symbols to write words or ideas

Alphabet Knowledge

-Recites/sings alphabet

-Matches upper-case letters

-Matches lower-case letters

-Identifies upper-case letters

-Identifies lower-case letters

Mathematical Thinking

Patterns and Relationships

-Sorts by color, shape, and size

-Orders or seriates several objects on the basis of one attribute

-Recognizes simple patterns and duplicates them

Number concept and operations

-Rote counts to 20

-Counts objects with meaning to 10

-Matches numerals

-Identifies by naming, numerals 0-10

Geometry and spatial relations

-Identifies 4 shapes- circle, square, rectangle, triangle

-Demonstrates concepts of positional/directional concepts (up/down, over/under, in/out, behind/in front of, beside/between, top/bottom, inside/outside, above/below, high/low, right/left, off/on, first/last, far/near, go/stop).

Measurement

-Shows understanding of and uses comparative words (big/little, large/small, short/long, tall/short, slow/fast, few/many, empty/full, less/more.

Physical Development

Gross-Motor Skills

-Pedals and steers a tricycle

-Jumps in place, landing on two feet

-Jumps consecutively- 7 jumps

-Balances on one foot for 5 seconds

-Hops on one foot 2-3 hops

-Hops on one foot- 6 ft.

-Throws a ball with direction- 5 ft.

-Catches a thrown ball with arms and body

Climbs a playground ladder

-Skips smoothly for 20 feet

Fine-Motor Skills

-Stacks 10, one-inch blocks

-Strings 4 1/2″ beads in two minutes

-Completes a seven piece interlocking puzzle

-Makes a pancake, snake, and ball from playdough

-Grasps pencil correctly

-Copies:  vertical line, horizontal line, circle, cross, square, V, triangle

-Copies first name

-Prints first name without a model

-Grasps scissors correctly

-Cuts within 1/4″ of a 6″ straight line on construction paper

-Cuts out a 3″ square on construction paper

-Cuts out a 3″ triangle on construction paper

-Cuts out a 3″ circle on construction paper

-Uses a glue stick appropriately

-Uses appropriate amount of glue for tasks

The Arts

Creative Arts

-Identifies 10 colors:  red, yellow, blue, green, orange, purple, black, white, brown, pink

-Uses a variety of art materials for tactile experience and exploration

Music/Movement

-Participates in group music experiences

-Participates in creative movement/dance

Creative Dramatics

-Makes believe with objects

-Takes on pretend roles and situations

Do you agree with this list?  Is there anything that needs to be added (or taken away) based on your experience???

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How to Improve Thinking Skills in Children?

Thinking Skills Chart.

Enhancing thinking skills in your kid can be real fun and thrilling. Nothing can be more effective than asking the right type of questions in an easy going manner. Questions that you ask should have simple and proper wordings. When you ask questions that lead to a mental stimulation of your kid’s thought process, it can be really good for you as well as your kid. One of the most important things to remember while asking probing questions to your kid is to creating questions by using different types or levels or platforms of thinking.

Enhancing thinking skills is best performed in a systematic and well calibrated manner. Your kid will not be ready to think on many aspects of life. Your main goal should focus at motivating his or her inner level of consciousness. Experts in human psychology grade thinking skills in humans into six categories. These thinking skills are common to all individuals and you will need to modify or restructure the questions in such a way that your kid will understand and comprehend the meaning very easily.

Developing Knowledge Skills

Knowledge skills include remembering, recalling or retrieving correct, right and appropriate and previously learned information or details to bring or draw out factual and data based answers which may either right or wrong.

Developing Comprehension Skills

In reality, comprehension means grasping, comprehending or understanding the real meaning of materials that signify materials and things.

Developing Application Skills

This skill involves applying and adapting previously learned and comprehended information or details to new, strange and unfamiliar scenarios.

Developing Synthesis Skills

This thinking skill is a bit difficult to learn and understand. It involves applying the previously acquired information, knowledge or skills to gel them together into a clear pattern which was not there before asking

Developing Evaluation Skills

This skill involves judging, inferring, deciding and concluding based on a set of conditions or criteria, without real or wrong answers.

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Steps To Raising Kids Who Like Books

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Do As Kindergarten Teachers Suggest Long Before You Meet Their kindergarten School Teacher
It’s never too soon to start reading to your kid. Apply these reading tips you’ll someday hear in parent/teacher conferences, and you’ll not only do wonders for your kid’s educational development, you’ll know what to mumble off whenever you get accused of not paying attention at a parent/teacher conference:

-Ritualize a reading time 5-7 days per week

-Alternate reading nights with your spouse to offer a new perspective and voice

-Get weird with the voices when you read

-Read when your kid’s around. Your example is  major factor

-Visit the library regularly and let your kid select whatever they want

 

Don’t Complain About Reading The Same Books Over And Over
My 3 kids could each read before kindergarten, and I attributes it to putting “miles on the page” with them on their favorite books: “They just need to hear it over and over again, point to the word, and have that access. It’s OK to read the same book 5,000 times.” Mind numbing and torturous for you, but OK.

Occasionally Read Them Something You Want To Read
Reserve a couple nights every week to put down the picture book you’ve read 5,000 times in favor of a classic you love. “They were far above what my little 6- or 5-year-old brain could handle, but I loved listening to him read it and that shared experience.” Bonus points for letting them hear their first swear words in the name of literacy.

Create Activities Around Elements In The Book
Make a book exciting and not just a bedtime precursor by using its thematic elements to inspire fun stuff in the real world.

But, mostly, you just need to make sure you kid sees a page at least as often as they see a screen. And talk funny when you read to them. Do that enough, and it should be smooth sailing.

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How to teach your baby to speak?

Baby speak

 

 

Babies absorb so much in the first few years of life. It is amazing what an impact everything you do has on an infant. With infants, it can sometimes be hard to tell what they are taking in because they cannot yet communicate with words. Teaching a baby to speak is fundamentally important for their development.

Talk to them all the time. As you change them, tell them what you are doing, and always speak in a soft, calming voice. Go through each step of everything you do with them. It may seem strange to say, “Now, I am taking off your diaper. I see you’re wet.” or, “Look at this nice big bowl of applesauce! Doesn’t it look yummy?” But babies respond to it, even if it may be hard to see it.

Watch your baby’s responses. When you talk to them, pause, as you would in a normal conversation, and give them time to respond. Sometimes they may smile, babble, or giggle, or sometimes they may just make a face or sit there and watch you. Either way, you are showing them the pattern of communication that they will use later on in life.

Read to them at least once a day. Show them the pictures and point out things in the pictures that go along with the story. Even if you are just reading a baby book of words, point out the picture of the ball, or the cat. They identify with things they can see. They make the connection between the words spoken and the pictures they see. Even taking objects that they are familiar with and speaking the name of the object will enhance their vocabulary, and make important connections between words and the world around them.

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Milestone on your child reading – Infographic

If you are a parent of a 6-month-old infant or a 5-year-old preschooler, you’ll find here useful tips on how to make books a part of the child’s playtime and bedtime routines.

Reading together with young kids helps them:

–learn to recognize letters,

–understand that print represents the spoken word,

–become aware of how to hold a book, turn the page and start at the beginning,

–realize the relationship between letters and sounds,

–expand their vocabulary,

–begin to develop oral language skills.

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Why some kids don’t like to read?

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It’s helpful to figure out your child’s reasons for not liking or wanting to read. These reasons can help you decide what will work best in motivating your child to discover or rediscover how much fun reading can be.

WHY SOME KIDS DON’T LIKE TO READ?It’s boring. Don’t despair if your children have this response to reading that is assigned at school. You can expose them to another kind of reading at home that is related to their interests.

 

++I don’t have the time. Kids are busy. School, friends, sports, television, and chores all compete for their time. Some children need your help in rearranging their schedules to make time for reading.

++It’s too hard. For some children, reading is a slow, difficult process. If your child is having a hard time reading, talk with his or her reading teacher. Ask about how you can find interesting books and materials written at a level that matches your child’s reading ability.

++It’s not important. Often children don’t appreciate how reading can be purposeful or relevant to their lives. Parents can take it upon themselves to find reading materials on subjects that do matter to their kids. Let your child see you reading, too.

++It’s no fun. For some children, especially those who have difficulty reading, books cause anxiety. Even for children with strong reading skills, pressure from school and home that emphasize reading for performance can make reading seem like a chore. Our advice: take the pressure off reading so that your children can enjoy it.

One great way to get kids motivated to read is simply giving them choices.  Let your child choose the book. Just like someone may love green beans but not like peas, some people love reading mysteries and others adventure tales. The lists go on and on. Once they find what they do like, you can’t keep a happy reader down

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How to encourage your child to Read?

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Encouraging Your Child to Read.

  • Read and reread your young child’s favorite books every day. Reading books with rhymes helps develop a child’s awareness of the sounds in our language, an ability that is often associated with reading success in the early grades. If you have ever read “Green Eggs and Ham ”, you will always remember the repetitive refrain, “I do not like green eggs and ham. I do not like them Sam I am.” Young children also delight in predictable books with memorable refrains.
  • Read books with a variety of characters. All children should have the opportunity to read books with characters that look and speak like them. At the same time, children also enjoy reading stories about fantastic characters, such as talking animals that stimulate their imagination and build on their love of pretend play.
  • Enjoy rhyming books together. Children enjoy books with rhyming patterns. Young children find the use of nonsense rhymes playful and fun. As you read, invite your child to fill in some of the rhyming words.
  • As you read, point out the important features of a book. Before you start reading, show your child the title and author on the front of the book. You might say, “The title of this book is ‘Amazing Grace’. It is written by Mary Hoffman and the pictures are by Caroline Birch.”
  • As you read, point to each word with your finger. This demonstrates to your child that there is a one-to-one match between the spoken and written word. It also draws your child’s attention to the link between the words you say and the words on the page. Pointing as you read also reinforces the concept that we read from top to bottom and from the left to the right.
  • Use stories to introduce your child to new words. Focusing on new vocabulary words increases reading comprehension. You can promote your child’s vocabulary development by drawing his attention to new or unusual words in the story. It’s important to just have fun with these new words and help your child use them in real-life situations. After learning “capsize” in a story, you can point out that the toy boat in your child’s bath has capsized and the animals are now in the water.

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You Can Do Everyday To Make Parenting Awesome!

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Accept imperfection:  Parenting is a huge opportunity to  accept that everyone makes mistakes and that these mistakes are a chance to learn together, a wonderful time for reflection and an opportunity to problem solve and practice acceptance, forgiveness and compassion.

Smile: It’s contagious and brings happiness to the world.  After spending time apart, when you meet again, greet your child with a smile. When things are going not so great, breathe and try to think of something that makes you smile.  It’s simple and yet so powerful.
Listen:   Make time to listen to your child’s dreams, hopes and stories. Listen to the heartaches, the problems and the fears. Do not worry so much about fixing and solving problems, instead listen with the intent to be there, listen with a kind heart and strive to  be present and supportive.
Dare to be Ridiculous: You want your child to have courage, joy, happiness and a desire to find meaning in life? Dare to be ridiculous: dance together, laugh, laugh and laugh some more, invent, create, play, whatever it may be, step outside your comfort zone once a day. It’s worth every moment of connection and it models amazing qualities needed for success.
Be Encouraging: The more we can encourage, the more our children can flourish.   Look and celebrate process and progress, determination and courage. Face success and failures with compassion and with the intent to be supportive.
Expect Limits to be Tested: Know that limits and boundaries will be tested because your child is still learning and trying to understand how the world and relationships work.  Shift your expectations and face those test with determination, kindness and flexibility and guide your child towards better choices in positive ways.
Communicate with Respect: Remember the impact that your voice has on your child’s inner voice and strive to communicate in ways that are respectful, positive and kind. Say yes as much as you can and say no when you really mean it.
Spend time together: Look for opportunities, no matter how short they may be, to truly connect with your child each day. It can be five minutes reading together, two minutes shared looking at a picture, 15 minutes playing a game or going out to lunch together, find those moments and be truly present with your child. Children that feel connected are naturally more cooperative.
Aim for Balance:  Make time for yourself to re-energize. Our children are learning not just from what we say but so much from watching us. Striving to lead a balanced life, which includes time for ourselves really matters.  When our own tanks are full, we can handle the ups and downs of parenting much better.
Choose Love: Things will get messy, loud, sticky, complicated and stressful.Choose love and building a relationship over proving you have power. Children learn so much when given a chance to fix their own mistakes. Choose love and over the years your child will feel capable and remember “my parents loved me so” and not  ”my parents always told me so”.
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Intelligence: Nature Vs Nurture

nature or nurture

 

A person’s learning and ability derives from a combination of genetics and environment. Nature may include some form of cognitive inherits from parents, and nurture includes the process of inferential and experiential learning that registers in the brain.

There are many components to intelligence. Memory, comparative behavior, planning behavior, classification, choice of inputs and outputs, language etc.

One important element is the use of time, not only “quality” but quantity time. Intelligence involves elements of knowing what is right or neccessary, but without proper guidance or mentoring, this intelligence is applied ” selectively” in the face of benefits and threats. Thus, it is important to guide the children in coupling intelligence with values and applications for a healthy individuals, and not intelligence as a unit only.

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10 reasons to read to your child!

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We all know that learning to read is important, but as parents what do we do to facilitate this milestone?

Reading to your child has many benefits one of which is simply having time to snuggle together.

Here are 10 reasons to read to your child.

1.When you read to your child, he/she will learn that reading is important to you, therefore reading will become important to him/her.

2.The more your child hears sounds, the better he/she will process these sounds into words. When a child is preschool/kindergarten age the listening word starts to become the written word.

3.Reading has a calming effect on a restless or fussy baby. Who doesn’t want an easy way to calm a fussy baby?

4.Reading is a wonderful before bed routine. Studies have shown that a child will thrive in an atmosphere in which routines are present.

5.Reading will help to develop your child’s imagination. Have you ever gotten lost in a good book? Your child can do the same while you are reading to him/her.

6.Reading will foster your child’s ability to listen and pay attention. With all the problems we here about concerning attention spans this is a great way to avoid that.

7.Reading to a young child will teach him/her the correct way to hold a book and turn the pages.

8.Reading to your child will develop in him/her the desire to become a reader.

9.Teachers will thank you

10.When a child is read a personalized story book, he/she will be able to recognize his/her name in print at an early age.

Isn’t it exciting to think that you can have such an effect on your child’s ability to read just by reading to him/her? You have the power to develop a life long joy of reading and learning in your child.

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Teach your child to read

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You can start teaching your child the building blocks for reading before they ever step foot in a classroom. Once your child enters school, you can work with your child and their teachers to help aid the learning process. Teaching your child to read will involve dedication and patience.
Make reading an important part of your child’s life before they can even speak. Read to your child as they develop in the womb and when they are babies. When your child is ready, start to read out loud to them while they follow along by looking at the pictures. You can then start to point out words in the book to your child while you read their favorite stories.

Read your children books with rhymes as well. The rhymes are easy for your child to remember and as they grow older they can learn to recognize some of the words in their favorite rhymes.

Start to introduce your baby to the alphabet from a young age. When your baby is just a couple months old you can start singing the ABC’s song to them. Between twelve to eighteen months, your little one will start to sing parts of the song on their own. A few months after that, you can start showing them the letters of the alphabet on a chart as you sing through the tune.

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Importance of Reading to Baby!

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Remember how you felt the first time your secret crush looked at you? That is nothing compared to your baby’s gaze at you. He looks at you in the eyes and you feel like you’re in heaven. You are then compelled to talk to him. It’s an automatic reaction. It is as if the baby is expecting you to interact with him. The truth is, your baby is really expecting something with that eye-contact!

In these moments, your “cootsie-coo” or the cute but utterly senseless “dah-dah-dah-dah,baby?” or “ ah- ba-ba-ba-ba…” babble, wouldn’t be enough. Of course, another way would be to make your baby giggle endlessly with your “peek-a-boo” However, you’re not waiting till your baby turns blue before you stop, are you?

The totally senseless sounds you make just to entertain your bundle of joy could only go on if you don’t mind being totally senseless for a longer period. Usually, it is you who gives up first. And the baby looks at you as if telling you not to stop pfizer viagra ligne. This is the time when you usually start talking to your baby with real words — This is where the story-telling comes in handy.

…. and then you read to your baby.

If you have been talking to your baby while he was still inside his mother’s womb, unbeknown to you, something almost magical is unfolding with this first time face-to-face talking and reading to your baby.

He remembers your voice!

According to the latest scientific findings, a developing fetus can hiccup and actually reacts to loud noises as early as on its ninth week. Your baby dreams, can taste the food that the mother eats, and he actually starts hearing by the end of the second trimester. In fact, he can distinguish the voices of his Mom from another person.

Research shows that a fetus’ heart rate slows down when his mother is speaking – this means he is calmed by the mother’s voice. Furthermore, the fetus responds to a familiar story (a story that has been repeatedly read to him while he’s inside the womb) and he prefers to listen to it over a new story read to him after birth.

Although there are no scientific findings to show that the baby appreciates the story that you read, reading to your baby (especially if you start while he is still inside his mother’s womb) becomes his first social encounter with you – this is your first bonding. Your voice becomes one of the first stimuli that he can identify with and connect to you. It would then become very important for the Mom to read aloud to the baby while he is inside the womb. Well, you can just talk but it would appear crazy, right? Besides, if you just ramble on, you might forget yourself and you might end up talking about something that pisses you off.

Here are some simple tips for reading to your baby:

• Pick a book that will become your baby’s favourite. Don’t worry if you find your baby prefers one single book read to him over and over. Don’t insist on introducing new ones if it is not welcomed. Babies learn by repetition. They may not even understand anything about it – they just love to hear the sound of your voice, and the familiarity of the words read to him. Pick a book that has simple, repetitive words. It would be better if the words rhyme, so you can read it in a sing-song voice.

• Pick a book with simple and large pictures of familiar objects against solid backgrounds. It would also help if it is one of those board books that could survive the baby’s hands, spit, and bites. You would also want to make sure it is always clean as the baby would always want to put it in his mouth.

• When reading, you don’t need to always start from the first page. You can immediately go to the baby’s favourite page (it might be because of the picture, or it might be because it is the part where your reading becomes very expressive – read with exaggerated voice expression; use different voices for different story characters; make animal sounds, or say “chug-chug-chug…tooot! toot!” when you’re reading about a train. You don’t have to finish the book in every sitting, too. Remember, the baby still does not understand the story.

• When reading, you don’t have to totally leave everything to what the author has written. You may interrupt the story every now and then to interact with the baby (this is specially so if the baby can already respond or point), e.g., “See? There’s goes the baby duck…Where’s the baby duck? Yes…that’s the baby duck. It goes, ‘quack! Quack’. What’s the sound of the duck?” Or point at the drawings or pictures and say, “This is the house. It is a red house…” etc.

The first five years of a human being’s life are a time of incredible growth and learning. Reading to your child gives him his first encounter with words, colors, numbers, letters and shapes. Constantly reading to your baby imprints these concepts in their minds. Reading becomes a part of your baby’s life. As months pass, notice how your baby behaves when he sees you holding his favourite book. He may even try to grab it from you, may help you flip the pages, point at objects, or he may even surprise you with a “Quack! Quack!” when he sees the duck.

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Intelligence Quotient vs Emotional Intelligence

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Intelligence Quotient

Advantages
  • An intelligent child might do well in professional career.
  • A smart child may perform well in academics and studies.
  • An academically skilled child is oriented towards a scholarly attitude.
Disadvantages
  • An intelligent child who is rich in IQ but poor in EQ may not be a successful person in leading a life free of tension and stress.
  • A child who is poor in emotional intelligence, may not understand others and in addition, he or she may not develop a sense of self-awareness.
  • A child that is poor in emotional skills may not develop social and emotional competence at all.

 

Emotional Intelligence
Advantages
  • An emotionally stable child has very good social skills and he or she can lead life free of stress, strain, pressure and deep emotions. In other words, mental health in such children may be very good.
  • An emotionally competent child can survive with greater societal challenges and strife.
  • An emotionally stronger child is adept in adjusting his or her life to changing situations and scenarios.
  • A child who has better emotion quotient can easily manage emotions in a better manner.
Disadvantages
  • A child who is poor in IQ may not be able to succeed in a professional world that demands academic and scholarly skills.
  • A child with poor IQ may find a traditional classroom very boring and difficult.
Any comparison should end here because a child of today’s world should be brought up with both of these intelligences. Both IQ and EQ are just like right and left eyes. One cannot exist without the other although EQ is still preferred a little higher. Emotional intelligence is often referred to as a “life saving skill” meaning it either makes or breaks the life of a person. Goleman, the noted proponent of EQ, discusses various factors that make up emotional intelligence.
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Why Smart Kids Fail?

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Average kids from average homes received 432 negative statements as opposed to 32 positive statements daily.

Words such as “Don’t touch that.” “No, it is done this way” “No, you are not big enough.”

The Best way to help a child be more confident is to use more Positive words to the child.
Here is a list of 15 encouraging words and phrases that will assist your child to keep trying and increase his self-esteem and confidence.

1. “I like the way you handled that”
2. “Wow, you really thought out the solution to that problem”
3. “I have faith in your ability”
4. “I appreciate what you did”
5. “You are really showing improvement”
6. “I know you will figure out a good way to do it next time”
7. “You don’t have to be perfect. Effort and improvement are important.”
8. “I trust you to be responsible”
9. “It must make you proud of yourself when you accomplish something like that”
10. “You are a valuable part of the team”
11. “It is okay to make a mistake, we all do. What do you think you learned from it?”
12. “How can we turn this into a positive?”
13. “I’m proud of you for trying”
14. “I’ll bet by next year you will be able to handle it, you just need to grow a little”
15. “I know you are disappointed that you didn’t win, but you’ll do better next time.”

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Reading aloud to your child.

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Reading aloud is fun, it open doors, and builds the desire to read. It gives educational advantage for your child, and can establish bonds between the both of you. Reading aloud also develops the ability to read alone. You can make reading aloud to your child more fun, if you speak in the voice of the characters in the book. For example, in Goldilocks and the Three Bears, you can use different voices for the three different bears. For even more fun, your children can also act or playact the parts of their favorite stories. Assign parts in the story which are fitting to the characters, for example, dad could be the Papa bear, mum could be the Mama bear, and your child, the baby bear. After doing this many times, the roles can be reversed, so your child gets chances to play the Papa bear or any other character. The game gets even more hilarious when the roles are mixed up.

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Ways a Parent can Help with Reading!

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